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Science
ALL IN THE MIND
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PROGRAMME INFO
Tuesday 21:00-21:30
Rpt: Wed 16:30-17:00
Dr Raj Persaud explores the limits and potential of the mind, revealing the latest research and bringing together experts and commentators from the worlds of psychiatry, psychology and mental health.
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LISTEN AGAINListen 30 min
Listen to 23 November
PRESENTER
PROF. RAJ PERSAUD
Raj Persaud
PROGRAMME DETAILS
Tuesday 23 November 2004
Brain Scan

BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER
 
The term 'Borderline Personality Disorder was first used by psychologist Adolf Stern in 1938 and covers a wide range of disorders from psychosis to schizophrenia.

The word personality refers to the pattern of thoughts, feelings and behaviour that makes each of us individual. Most people tend to behave in fairly predictable ways, learning from past experiences and changing their behaviour to cope with life more effectively. As a result their personalities also develop and change with the circumstances.
 
A person with a borderline personality disorder is likely to be quite inflexible and have a limited range of attitudes and behaviours which can often cause distress to them and to others.

Joshua Cole was diagnosed with a borderline personality disorder nine years ago, he is the founder of BPD World, a website that helps and advises people who suffer from the disorder.
 
Raj Persaud talks to Catherine Allen a consultant clinical psychologist at St George's Hospital in Morpeth and the author of a paper on BPD published in the Autumn 2004 edition of the Journal of Family Therapy.
 
VIRTUAL FACE
How would you feel interacting with a virtual human? Raj Persaud visits The Dana Centre at the Science Museum in London for one of a continuing series of events about face technology and meets Gary Bracey who runs a 3D face changing technology company called Digimask. Gray re-creates Raj from a photograph, turning him into his virtual on-screen self.
 
Raj also meets Jeremiah - a digitally created character with the ability to interact and recognise human behaviour. Dr Richard Bowden, from the School of Electronics and Physical Sciences at the University of Surrey, explains the technology behind Jeremiah.
 
Raj Persaud is joined by Dr Andy Calder a senior scientist at the Medical Research Council's Cognition and Brain sciences Unit, in Cambridge, whose area of interest is in the neuropsychology of emotions. They discuss scientists' ability to map out the part of the brain engaged in facial recognition, what happens when this part of the brain is damaged and the possible psychological and therapeutic benefits of experiments with virtual faces.
 
SUPERSTITION
Most of us are a little bit superstitious, whether we have a lucky charm of some sort, or cross our fingers on occasion for good luck. But why do we set any store by such irrational practices? Raj Persaud discusses how people acquire superstitions and their effect with Richard Wiseman, professor of psychology at Hertfordshire University, who recently published a paper on the psychological purpose of superstition. What did his findings tell us about the psychological impact of superstitions on our lives?
 
Additional information:
 
BDPWORLD 
 
BORDERLINE UK
 
Virtually Human! at the Science Museum's Dana Centre is part of a series of events on the face and complements the Future Face exhibition at the Science Museum in association with the Wellcome Trust running until February 2005. 

Digimask

Jeremiah

Dr Richard Bowden
University of Surrey, School of Electronics and Physical Sciences

Virtual humans can be used to increase access to information for Deaf people who use sign language.  Individual signs are built and saved in a lexicon, and they can then be compiled into phrases using software that automatically blends them smoothly together.  These phrases can be easily edited by changing the sequence of signs, making it fast and economical to maintain up to date information. 

eSIGN - A computer based virtual signer

(RNID) Royal National Institute for the Deaf

Dr Andy Calder
Senior scientist at the Medical Research Council's Cognition and Brain sciences Unit, in Cambridge

Professor Richard Wiseman

Hertfordshire University, Psychology Department, College Lane
 
The Luck Factor
Dr Richard Wiseman
Publisher: Arrow
ISBN 0099443244
 
The Luck Factor

Believing in Magic: The Psychology of Superstition
Professor Stuart Vyse
Publisher: Oxford University Press Inc, USA
ISBN 0195136349.


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