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The Routes of English - BBC Radio 4
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400 - The World of English
400
400 During the fifth century, the Angles, the Saxons and the Jutes, all Germanic tribes, invaded Britain.
  • The Saxons, from Germany, landed in the south and west.
  • The Angles, from Denmark, landed in present-day East Anglia.
  • The Jutes arrived in Kent from north Denmark.

Their closely related Germanic languages formed the basis of English which soon pushed the existing Celtic languages out of what is now central and southern England and into Wales, Cornwall and Northumbria.

Much of the Anglo-Saxon, or as it is more commonly known Old English, vocabulary remains in use today, and can be heard in words such as ox, earth, plough and sheep - reflecting the farming culture of the Anglo-Saxons.
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