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Stand at East
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Listen to the latest editionSaturday, 10.30 - 11am
4 June - 18 June 2005
Sir Mark Tully presents a unique testimony of the Indian Army.
 Saturday 4 - 18 June 2005, 10.30 - 11am
Sir Mark TullyWhich army, over two million men strong, had not a single conscript? Which army bore the brunt of the Japanese attack on Burma and Malaya? Which army fought in North Africa and took part in the assault on Monte Cassino in Italy?

The answer is the World War Two Indian Army: a remarkable fighting force of men from almost every caste, creed and corner of India, serving under both British and Indian officers. It played a crucial but forgotten role in the allied victory.

Sir Mark Tully presents a unique testimony of this force in its glory days.
 Saturday 4 June 2005, 10.30 - 11am
Sir Mark Tully interviews a veteran of the Imperial Indian Army1: And then, officially, we were mechanised

Mark Tully presents a unique, untapped testimony that recalls the almost forgotten role of the Indian Army during the Second World War.

It was a remarkable fighting force of men from almost every caste and creed, serving under both British and Indian officers, that bore the brunt of the Japanese attack on Malaya and Burma.

Tully begins with the transformation of the Indian Army, changing horses for tanks, and small arms for artillery, into a force that became the world's largest volunteer army.

Listen to this episodeListen again to episode 1
 Saturday 11 June 2005, 10.30 - 11am
Veterans of the Indian Army from World War 22:  They were the unsung heroes of the campaign.

Survivors of the gruelling Burma campaign recall the horrors of battle.

Naga warriors pay tribute to their heroine queen Ursula Graham-Bower, a remarkable Englishwoman who led them against the Japanese.

Old soldiers remember the touching bravery and endurance of their military mules.

And veterans of the Indian National Army reflect on the provocations which drove them into fighting against the British.
 
listen to this episodeListen again to episode 2
Saturday 18 June 2005, 10.30 - 11am
Sir Mark Tully with members of the current Indain Army3: You've got to admire brave men, whatever side they are on
 
At the famous battle sites of Imphal and Kohima, locals remember life under the Japanese Army.

Indian Army soldiers recall sickness and hunger and bravery on both sides and the last surviving Indian veteran to hold the VC talks about his war.

At the Rajputana Rifles regimental centre, Indian officers reflect on the legacy of the British.

And veterans of what is called the forgotten army demand recognition for their achievement in inflicting the biggest defeat on land the Japanese ever suffered.

Listen to this episode Listen again to episode 3
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