bbc.co.uk
Home
Explore the BBC
3 Oct 2014
Click for a Text Only version of this page
BBC Homepage
BBC Radio

Radio 4
Radio 4 History
BBC History

This Sceptred Isle

Dynasties

55 BC - 1087

1087 - 1327

1327 - 1547

1547 - 1660

1660 - 1702

1702 - 1760

1760 - 1792

1792 - 1837

1837 - 1861

1861 - 1901

1901 - 1919

1920 - 1939

1940 - 1959

1960 - 1979

1980 - 1999


 

Contact Us

Help


Like this page?
Send it to a friend!


This Sceptred Isle

Ireland & Napoleon
England's connection with Ireland had been unbroken since the 12th century when Henry II conquered it. Ireland was rebellious and it was not until Elizabethan times that it was truly united. Protestantism was introduced and The Penal Code controlled the Catholics. In 1798 the United Irishmen revolted in the hope of setting up an Irish Republic. They failed and Pitt the Younger passed the 1801 Act of Union.

Meanwhile the Napoleonic Wars were causing chaos in Europe. Nelson saved Britain from invasion at the Battle of Trafalgar. Britain now really ruled the waves. Though the wars still raged on land until Waterloo in 1815.

By 1810 George III was permanently insane. The Regency Act was passed. The Prince of Wales became regent for one year. The King was placed in the care of Queen Charlotte and a council of advisors. In 1820 George III finally died and George IV became King.

Horatio, Lord Nelson
Horatio, Lord Nelson
HORATIO, LORD NELSON (1758-1805)

  • First Viscount Nelson
  • The Royal Navy's most revered sailor
  • Son of a Norfolk clergyman
  • Considered a sickly child
  • Joined the navy aged 12 in 1770, largely thanks to his uncle who was a senior officer
  • Fought in the War of American Independence
  • In 1787 married Frances Nisbet
  • Began his infamous affair with Emma, the wife of Sir William, in Naples
  • They later had a child, Horatia
  • In 1793 lost his right eye fighting at Corsica
  • Won at Cape St Vincent in 1797
  • Lost his right arm at Tenerife the same year
  • In 1798 won the Battle of Aboukir Bay (the Nile)
  • Became rear-admiral in 1801
  • Won at Copenhagen
  • At Trafalgar in October 1805 was killed aboard his flagship Victory
  • Apart from his victories, Nelson is remembered as someone who brought order to often disorganised fleets and made sure that all his captains knew exactly what he had in mind before each campaign
  • Every year, the Royal Navy celebrates Trafalgar Day and the toast is The Immortal Memory

did you know?
Nelson was a feeble child and might never have been taken into the navy but for his uncle, Maurice Suckling, who was captain of his first ship the Raisonnable.

Select historical period
previousnext

/home/system/data/timb/kwikquiz.dat does not exist

/home/system/data/timb/kwikquiz.html does not exist

Chronology
1792 French Revolutionary Wars begin
1793 Britain enters the Wars
1801 Pitt the Younger resigns
1802 Napoleonic Wars begin
1805 Nelson is victorious but dies at Trafalgar
1810 George III becomes insane
1815 Battle of Waterloo end Napoleonic Wars
1820 George III dies
George IV becomes king

GEORGIAN SEASIDE TOWNS WHICH BECAME POPULAR WHEN HOLIDAY MAKERS COULD NOT REACH THEIR VILLAS IN FRANCE
Weymouth
Sidmouth
Torquay
Brighton


About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy