bbc.co.uk
Home
Explore the BBC
Radio 4
PROGRAMME FINDER:
Programmes
Podcast
Schedule
Presenters
PROGRAMME GENRES:
News
Drama
Comedy
Science
Religion|Ethics
History
Factual
Messageboards
Radio 4 Tickets
Radio 4 Help

About the BBC

Contact Us

Help


Like this page?
Send it to a friend!

 
BBC Radio 4 - 92 to 94 FM and 198 Long WaveListen to Digital Radio, Digital TV and OnlineListen on Digital Radio, Digital TV and Online

History
THE ROMAN WAY
MISSED A PROGRAMME?
Go to the Listen Again page


THE LATEST PROGRAMME
Begins Sunday 19 January 2003, 1.30 - 2,00 pm for four Sundays.
Using contemporary accounts from all levels of society, from the chattering classes to humble foot-soldiers, from senators to slaves, The Roman Way explores different aspects of everyday life, two millennia ago.


Filling the Mind

Education was very important to the Roman citizen: just as today, it was believed to be a ticket to a better life. What was on the curriculum and who were the pupils? One of the topics which was popular then, but which has slipped somewhat from school-lessons today, was rhetoric. Rhetoric was seen as a vital social and professional skill. How was it taught, who wanted to learn it, and why did Roman citizens place so much emphasis on it?

Writing tablet from the entrepreneur Octavius to Candidus, Roman Britain, late 1st or early 2nd century AD
picture copyright The British Museum


We also explore the development of the novel and the passion for public readings. From romantic novels to science-fiction, what books were the Roman equivalent of best-sellers? Who attended the readings and what sort of person was considered a celebrity?


Fragments of painted plaster, Roman Britain, 1st or 2nd century AD
picture copyright The British Museum

The people of the Roman Empire cared deeply about posterity, and liked to think that their memory would live on after they'd died. What sort measures did rich and poor take to ensure that they wouldn't be forgotten?

Further reading

Peter Jones
An Intelligent Person's Guide to Classics
Duckworth

P Jones & K Sidwell
The World of Rome
Cambridge 1997

Jerome Carcopino
Daily Life in Ancient Rome
Penguin

Fergus Millar
The Roman Empire and Its Neighbours
Duckworth

Anthony Birley
Garrison Life at Vindolanda - A Band of Brothers
Tempus

Pliny (tr) Betty Radice
The Letters of the Younger Pliny
Penguin Classics

Marcus Aurelius (tr) Maxwell Staniforth
Meditations
Penguin Classics

Seneca (tr) Robin Campbell
Letters from a Stoic
Penguin Classics

Tim Cornell & John Matthews
Atlas of the Roman World
New York: Facts on File c1982

Listen Live
Audio Help
LISTEN AGAIN
Listen to l - Life at the Edge
Listen to ll - Life at the Top
Listen to lll - Filling the day
Listen to lV - Filling the Mind
Listen to David Aaronovitch's Roman Way
Listen to the producer's account of making the series..
ROMAN WAY PAGES
Go to - The Roman Way homepage
Go to l - Life at the Edge
Go to ll - Life at the Top
Go to lll - Filling the Day
Go to lV - Filling the Mind
Go to - Ancient Roman recipes
Go to - Useful Latin phrases for the Forum?
Go to - David Aaronovitch's Roman Way
Go to - The producer's insight into making the programme.
DON'T MISS
In Our Time
Thursday 9.00-9.45am, rpt 9.30-10.00pm. Melvyn Bragg explores the history of ideas. Listen again online or download the latest programme as an mp3 file.
USEFUL LINKS
Vindolanda
BBC History: Roman Britain
This Sceptred Isle
Appian Way - a journey between two seas
Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies
Aphrodisias
Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors
British Museum COMPASS search
Kansas University: LacusCurtius
Argos: Ancient and medieval search
www.bbc.co.uk/history
news.bbc.co.uk
The BBC is not responsible for external sites.


PRESENTER
David Aaronovitch
David Aaronovitch is a broadcaster and journalist. Having been editor of On The Record, he moved onto presenting a number of programmes, including On Air, The Argument and Radio 4's Copy Snatchers. He is also a regular columnist on The Independent.

News & Current Affairs | Arts & Drama | Comedy & Quizzes | Science | Religion & Ethics | History | Factual

Back to top

About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy