BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.


Accessibility help
Text only
BBC Homepage
BBC Radio
BBC Radio 4 - 92 to 94 FM and 198 Long WaveListen to Digital Radio, Digital TV and OnlineListen on Digital Radio, Digital TV and Online

PROGRAMME FINDER:
Programmes
Podcasts
Schedule
Presenters
PROGRAMME GENRES:
News
Drama
Comedy
Science
Religion|Ethics
History
Factual
Messageboards
Radio 4 Tickets
Radio 4 Help

Contact Us

Like this page?
Send it to a friend!

 


THINKING ALLOWED
MISSED A PROGRAMME?
Go to the Listen Again page
Thinking Allowed
Wednesday 16:00-16:30
Laurie Taylor discusses the latest social science research.
07 January 2009  repeat 11 January
Listen to this programme in full
POPULAR MUSIC AND VIOLENCE
David Gray, Eminen, ACDC, Bruce Springsteen, Christina Aguilera and Nancy Sinatra are artists whose music - despite their protests - have all been used by states as instruments of war.  Laurie Taylor is joined by Dr Martin Cloonan, co-author of the Dark Side of the Tune and Caspar Melville, former lecturer in Popular Music Studies at Goldsmiths, to discuss how music is used in conflicts, and how it is increasingly employed by public utilities and commercial organisations in attempts to control what people do.

THE ETYMOLOGY OF ‘HOOLIGAN’
According to Professor Geoffrey Pearson the word "hooligan" made its official entrance into the English language during the summer of 1898, in the wake of a rowdy, August bank holiday celebration in London when hundreds of people appeared before the courts on charges of assault and drunkenness.  Professor Pearson expands on the origins of the word ‘hooligan’.
Additional information:

Dr Martin Cloonan

Senior Lecturer and Convener of Postgraduate Studies, Department of Music, University of Glasgow
Department of Music, 14 University Gardens, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QH
tel: 0141 330 4093

Dark Side of the Tune: Popular Music and Violence
by Bruce Johnson and Martin Cloonan
Publisher: Ashgate
ISBN-10: 0754658724
ISBN-13: 978-0754658726

Caspar Melville
Editor of New Humanist and former lecturer in Popular Music Studies at Goldsmiths, London

Professor Geoffrey Pearson
Professor of Criminology in the Department of Professional and Community Education (PACE) at Goldsmiths University, London
Centre for Urban and Community Research (CUCR), Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross, London SE14 6NW - Tel: 020 7919 7390

Hooligan: A History of Respectable Fears
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN-10: 0333234006
ISBN-13: 978-0333234006
    The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites
    Listen Live
    Audio Help
    [an error occurred while processing this directive]

    Thinking Allowed

    Debate

    Open University logo

    Producer's Pick

    Recent  Programmes

    See also



    About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy