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LEARNING CURVE
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The Learning Curve
Listen to the latest editionMon 20:30 - 21:00
Sun 23:00 - 23:30 (rpt)
 
The definitive guide to learning
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Monday 26 May 2008
Libby Purves presents this week's edition of the Learning Curve.
How schools deal with issues of teenage sexual activity
Nearly one-third of people have their first sexual experience before 16, the legal age of consent, and are, therefore, technically committing a crime. The Children’s Commissioner for Scotland, Kathleen Marshall, said last week that Scotland is moving towards de-criminalising sex between 13-15 year olds.
Interview with a mother who emailed the programme about her son’s experience when, at the age of 14, he was accused of rape; and Libby talks to Simon Blake, Chief Executive of Brook, the sexual health charity for young people.

Fire-fighting skills
School children in West Yorkshire are being given a fire-fighting course by the local fire service. Year 10 pupils have lessons in a dedicated classroom at the fire station with their own purpose-built fire engine. The course was originally set up to encourage reluctant low-achievers to take an interest in education, and has become so popular it has been extended.
Lesley Hilton went to find out more at Wakefield City High School.

Young People in Jobs Without Training & Government plans to keep young people in education and training until 18
The Education and Skills Bill intends to implement the Leitch recommendation of universal education and training up to 18.  There is concern about young people in jobs without training. They will most probably be in low-waged or casual work.  A recent research project from the School of Education and Lifelong Learning at the University of Exeter focuses on young people in the South West . Libby talks to Professor Jocey Quinn from the Institute for Policy Studies in Education at London Metropolitan University, one of the Project Directors, about the findings; and to Martin Johnson, the Acting Deputy General Secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, about the Government's plans.
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