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LEARNING CURVE
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The Learning Curve
Mon 20:30 - 21:00
Sun 23:00 - 23:30 (rpt)
 
The definitive guide to learning
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Monday 18 February 2008
Listen to this programme in full
Libby Purves presents this week's edition of the Learning Curve.
ADULT READING, WRITING AND NUMERACY ILLITERACY
A fascinating new study, using findings based on studies dating from the 1970s which looked at 17,000 British children’s reading, writing and numeracy difficulties are still at a disadvantage nearly 40 years on. The study, carried out by the National Research Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy, identifies where and when illiteracy and innumeracy issues begin, and illustrates how, without intervention, the problem becomes exponentially worse, as a person gets older.
Interview with the author of the report, Professor John Bynner, Professor of Social Sciences in Education from the Institute for Education.  
Reporter, Anna Bailey visited a London college to ask some of the adult learners when their problems started.

STAGGERED COLLEGE DAYS
The Hugh Christie Technology College in Kent introduced a "staggered day" last September, when a new school building was devised with 20% less space. The college also took note of research that found that teenagers’ body clocks are more effective for learning later in the day.
Interview with the principal, Jon Barker about the impact of these changes.

SELF DEFENCE CLASSES FOR TEACHERS
Today, the Home Secretary, Jacqui Smith, has announced a violent crime action campaign in the latest stage of the government’s efforts to counter violent youth crime.
Stories of vicious assaults on teachers are becoming ever more common. The growing American-style claims culture has left many teachers unsure what their rights are and the legal situation if they confront potentially violent pupils.  Yorkshire community police officer, Sean O’Connor, is running self-defence classes for teachers. Caroline Swinburne sat in on the introductory lesson to give teachers some practical skills and the confidence to deal with attacks or intimidation.

TEACHERS AND THE LAW
Can a teacher be sued if a child traps a finger in a classroom door? What if a teacher puts a sympathetic arm around a pupil’s shoulder but then is accused of misconduct by the parents? The legal pitfalls for teachers are a minefield and it is not always easy to know what the regulations are for each specific incident.  Kim Insley, a tutor at the Institute of Education, joins Libby to discuss her new book, Teachers and the Law, which she hopes will fill in some of the information gaps for teachers and trainee teachers where legal matters are concerned..


Additional Information:
Study - Illuminating Disadvantage comes out of the National Research Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy (NRDC) at the Institute of Education

Hugh Christie Technology College in Kent
Article - Teenagers: Lost in Time – from the New Scientist

Teachers and the Law (£14.99) is available from the Institute of Education

Teachers TV
From Monday 18 February it is spring half term on Teachers TV, The Jonathan Dimbleby Big Debate: Religion in Schools, will be airing and there is a focus on Lessons from Abroad
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