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factual
LEARNING CURVE
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The Learning Curve
Mon 20:30 - 21:00
Sun 23:00 - 23:30 (rpt)
 
The definitive guide to learning
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Latest programme
Monday 18 September 2006
Listen to this programme in full
Libby Purves
Libby Purves presents this week's edition of the Learning Curve
ADULT EDUCATION
How should the government divide the finite pot of money for adult education? By content of course? Type of learner? And what percentage of fees should be shouldered by individual/employer/government? Libby discusses the issue with Bill Rammell: Minister of State for Higher Education and Lifelong Learning; Alan Tuckett, Director of The National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) the leading non-government organisation for lifelong learning; and Brian Groombridge, Professor Emeritus of Adult Education, University of London and President of the Educational Centres Association.

PAUL ROBESON
On Wednesday, 20 September, The School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) are unveiling a plaque to honour the life and achievements of Paul Robeson, who took African languages and linguistics classes there in 1934. Libby is joined by Philip Jaggar, Professor of West African Linguistics and Associate Dean (Research), Faculty of Languages & Cultures, SOAS; and Dr. Akin Oyetade, Lecturer in Yoruba; Head of Department, Department of the Languages and Cultures of Africa, SOAS.

MEDICAL SCHOOL
How difficult is it to get into medical school? The answer is DIFFICULT. There are a minimum of three applicants for every place. Excellent exam results are required. At least one additional test has to be taken on top of A-levels. And candidates are expected to demonstrate through extra-curriculum activities that they really do have a commitment to becoming a doctor. Daunting for anyone, especially if there are no doctors in your family and if your school has no tradition of sending students to medical schools. This August medical students from Nottingham University ran a week-long event for students from local state schools to give them a taste of what being a doctor would be like. Libby finds out more from second-year medical student Rowena Pykett who was one of the main organisers; Peter Tennant who has just taken his AS levels and was one of the students who attended the event; and she talks to Professor John Tooke who is chair of the council of heads of medical Schools (CHMS) and Dean of Peninsular medical School.
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