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PROGRAMME INFO
Sunday 12:30-13:00
Rpt: Monday 16:00-16:30
From amaranth to zabaglione, Sheila Dillon and Derek Cooper investigate every aspect of the food we eat.
LISTEN AGAIN
Listen to the Food Programme for02 January 2005

   
PRESENTERS
Sheila Dillon
Simon Parkes
Andrew Jefford
Derek Cooper
Sheila Dillon, Andrew Jefford and Simon Parkes, Derek Cooper
PROGRAMME DETAILS
02 January 2005      
Gerard Baker and students from Birmingham College of Food, Tourism and Creative Studies


Herring used to be a staple of our diet, as well as of our economy and the story of the herring is entwined with the history of commercial fishing.

In this week's 'Food Programme', Sheila Dillon discovers the importance of herring, known affectionately as the 'silver darlings' and finds out why the fish is such a healthy and versatile food.

Sheila goes out on a fishing boat from the ancient herring port of Clovelly in north Devon with fisherman, Steve Perham and with Mike Smylie, or 'Kipperman' who won Best Campaigner/Educator in the BBC Radio Four Food and Farming Awards 2004.

There was herring fishing in Clovelly as far back as 1602 and records show that in 1749, there were a hundred herring boats in the port. At the height of the season, most villagers were involved in dealing with the catch.

Steve is the local Harbourmaster and one of a long line of herring fishermen in his family. However, today, there are just three herring boats in Clovelly.

Mike Smylie has been campaigning on the benefits and versatility of herring for many years. He tells Sheila about the history of herring fishing and his work to make people aware of the importance of this much under-rated fish.

Professor Michael Crawford has been studying nutrition and disease for the past four decades. He explains why fish oils are an essential part of our diet for brain function and to help prevent disease.

Professor Joseph Hibbeln
is from the USA Government's National Institutes of Health and he explains some of the beneficial effects fish eating has on our behaviour.

Mitchell Tonks, fishmonger turned chef and founder of the 'Fishworks' seafood restaurants will demonstrate how herring is a simple dish to cook and enjoy. Black in Clovelly, Sheila and Mike tuck into their fresh herring catch, with the hope that this fish native to our waters, might become popular once more.

Further Information

Mike Smylie - aka 'Kipperman'

Herring a History of the Silver Darlings by Mike Smylie published by Tempus Publishing Ltd.
ISBN 9 780752 429885

Professor Michael Crawford
Professor at the Institute of Brain Chemistry and Human Nutrition at London Metropolitan University

Professor Joseph Hibbeln
National Institutes of Health
9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda
Maryland 20892
Tel: 001-301-496-4000

Tempus Publishing Limited
The Mill, Brimscombe Port
Stroud
Gloucestershire
GL5 2QG

BBC Food website

BBC News Online looks at how changes in the countryside have affected the people who live there - and what they can expect in the future.

Fishworks

Herring Recipe as cooked at Fishworks (Serves 2)

4 Cornish herrings, filleted
1 bulb of fennel
half a red chilli chopped (with seeds if you like it hot)
A few small capers
chopped soft herbs (basil, mint, parsley)
a good olive oil
lemon juice
Maldon sea salt

Heat a char-grill pan till smoking, slash the skins of the herring fillets and season.

Grill the fish skin side down for two minutes to crisp the skin, remove and place on a baking tray flesh side down then put into a hot oven (220 degrees) for about three minutes to cook through. (You can add a splash of olive oil to the fish if you wish).

Meanwhile to make the salad, quarter the fennel and remove the core, then slice very finely length ways. Place in a bowl and dress with the lemon luice, sea salt and olive oil. Then add the freshly chopped herbs and chilli, by this time the herrings will be cooked.

To present the dish place the salad in the middle of the plate and lay the herring fillets skin side up on the top, crush over a little more of the sea salt and a drizzle of olive oil.


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