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comedy
The Museum of Curiosity: Gallery
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The Museum of Curiosity
The big bang is a widely accepted theory of the origin of the universe. Considering the history of conflict between the scientific community and the church over the “moment of creation”, it is ironic that it was first proposed by a Belgian priest, Father Georges-Henri Lemaître (in 1923). The thinking behind the theory is simple. Scientists are pretty sure that the galaxies that make up the visible universe are flying apart. So, if you imagine going back in time (say, about 14 billion years), you’ll get back to a moment when absolutely everything was crammed together in a tiny space. Our current understanding is that the universe began smaller than a proton, but expanded outwards unimaginably quickly until it was about the size of a grapefruit. The speed at which this happened defies conventional laws of physics, and to explain it, physicists have come up with “inflation theory”. This unbelievably hot grapefruit contained the entire mass of the universe. From that moment on, the rate of expansion is easily accounted for by the known laws of physics. Understanding rules that governed the interior of this mysterious object will help us to understand the fate of the universe itself. Photograph © nebarnix on Flickr. Next Image
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