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comedy
The Museum of Curiosity: Gallery
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The Museum of Curiosity
What is nothing? Can we even discuss something that doesn’t exist? Or does this very discussion mean that “nothing” must exist? A maxim which reaches us from antiquity is that “nature abhors a vacuum”. It had been orthodoxy from Aristotle, who claimed that there could not be an empty space, until the 17th century when Evangelista Torricelli, inventor of the barometer, became the first person to create a vacuum at the top of a tube of mercury. However modern physics has resurrected the idea that a perfect vacuum cannot exist: according to the laws of quantum physics, a vacuum is filled with virtual particles that constantly come in and out of existence. Moreover, one current theory is that the universe could be one giant quantum fluctuation: in other words the whole universe could have emerged from a vacuum. Picture courtesy of no one. Next Image
What is nothing? Can we even discuss something that doesn’t exist? Or does this very discussion mean that “nothing” must exist? A maxim which reaches us from antiquity is that “nature abhors a vacuum”. It had been orthodoxy from Aristotle, who claimed that there could not be an empty space, until the 17th century when Evangelista Torricelli, inventor of the barometer, became the first person to create a vacuum at the top of a tube of mercury. However modern physics has resurrected the idea that a perfect vacuum cannot exist: according to the laws of quantum physics, a vacuum is filled with virtual particles that constantly come in and out of existence. Moreover, one current theory is that the universe could be one giant quantum fluctuation: in other words the whole universe could have emerged from a vacuum. Picture courtesy of no one.
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