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World On Your Street: The Global Music Challenge
Charts Martin Conway
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Describe the atmosphere and live music at a local pub, restaurant, festival, church or temple, club night.... inspire other people to check it out!


FOOTBALL CHANTS
Koreans chant in English, Cameroonians adapt an ancient folk song... Listen below to our Football Chants collected across Manchester, and add your own.

Origin of chant

1 Ireland

2 Nigeria

3 South Korea

4 France

5 England

6 China

7 Cameroon

8 Argentina

9 Spain

10 Italy

Contributor

MARTIN CONWAY

EKAEKA ITUEM

SANG-YOUNG

BENEDICTE ROUBERT

PAUL MCHUGH

DAVID CHOW

RAYMOND ABANDA

CECILIA HERMIDA

PRO CANDAL

PAULO SILVESTRI


Song: Fields of Athenry
Country: Ireland
Chosen by: Martin Conway


Listen  Listen to an interview with Martin Conway and hear the chant.

Go to part 1 | 2

I've been living in Manchester for the last three years. I come from Strabane, a town across the water in the North of Ireland, smack on the border with Donegal - but we have no borders at the Irish centre in Manchester which is where I'll be watching the Ireland games.

There's only one football song which really matters for us Irish football fans and that's 'The Fields of Athenry'.

This is a song that harks back back to the famine though it was only written fairly recently. It lyrics sing of how people were forced to emigrate so I suppose it's a link back to those times when the Irish had to unite. There are lots of Irish people all over the world, so to them 'The Fields of Athenry' is a symbol of their exile.

My father was a fanatical follower of Gaelic football which is a strictly Irish sport and he took me half way around Ireland by the time I was about nine years old following football. He was very vociferous and vivid in his description of what was going on and I guess he passed that on to me. He had to describe things vividly because I'm actually without sight - I have two false eyes yet I have a deep understanding of sport and soccer in particular. Luckily football's such a real experience, it's easy to visualise the length of a pitch and where the players are placed.

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