[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] BBC - (none) - Night Waves - 31 May 2006 [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page was last updated in May 2006We've left it here for reference.More information

21 August 2014
Accessibility help
Text only

BBC Homepage
» 

Contact Us

Like this page?
Send it to a friend!

 

31 May 2006

Wednesday 31 May 2006 21:30-22:15 (Radio 3)

Who speaks for Science? The complicated relationship between science and the media is the subject for tonight's Night Waves; Undercurrents with Philip Dodd and guests.

Duration:

45 minutes

Playlist

Science needs the media to encourage funding and promote ideas. But science also accuses the media of trivialising its efforts and misinterpreting its findings.

For the media, science provides stories - some serious some sensational - that help its readers negotiate their changing relationship with the natural world. But the media also accuses scientists of over-complicating their subject and of living a sheltered existence removed from everyday realities.

In an age when science has become the subject of political controversy and moral anxiety who should the public look to for enlightenment? Do scientists, like politicians, need an intelligent scrutinising press? Or do we allow the pursuit of scientific knowledge to be hijacked by the agenda of broadsheets and tabloids at our peril?

On tonight's Night Waves; Undercurrents, Philip Dodd is joined by Dr Ben Goldacre, author of the newspaper column Bad Science; Vivienne Parry, who can safely claim to be the only science writer to have worked simultaneously for the journal of Molecular Biology and the News of the World; the broadcaster Gabrielle Walker and Professor Sir Patrick Bateson, Fellow of the Royal Society.




About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy