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Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Ragtime
A piano style that evolved in the USA during the early 20th Century. Ragtime is a mixture of Afro-American and European influence, and was one of the most important precursors for jazz. Think Scott Joplin.

Range
Distance between the lowest and highest tones of a melody, an instrument or a voice.

Rhythm Guitar
The rhythm guitar player typically provides both rhythmic and harmonic backdrop for the single note voices and instruments in a band (vocals, lead guitar, brass etc.). Rhythm guitar can be as straightforward as strumming some acoustic chords such as John Lennon in "I Should Have Known Better" or something much more structured and funky such as James Brown’s "Sex Machine".

Riff
A short repeated melodic phrase or 'signature' that is constructed to attract attention. Most riffs last for two bars but can vary from one to four bars in length. A classic riff can be heard on the introduction to "(I can't get no) Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones.

Rockabilly
The mating of hillbilly country and Delta blues, Rockabilly, found its first expression at Sun Studios in Memphis, TN, during the mid 50s. The genre was usually built around small ensembles where a string bass, lean, economical, rhythm-heavy electric guitar, minimal drum work and acoustic guitar, supported an addled singing style sometimes with hiccupping, stuttering vocals, and set in a highly reverberant audio mix. Examples: Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Gene Vincent, Wanda Jackson, and Eddie Cochran. Rockabilly has often been played by gentlemen with inordinately large quiffs.





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