Dr Lucie Green

Astronomy and space exploration have been my passion for many years now.

Whilst an undergraduate at Sussex University I began studying binary stars. However, during a trip to the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory I was shown the Sun through a hydrogen alpha filter and this led to a shift in my research focus. I was surprised and fascinated by the structure I saw, and from them on I was hooked by the Sun.

I study the evolution of immense magnetic structures in the Sun's atmosphere
Prof Lucie Green

Back at Sussex I turned the undergraduate telescope into a solar observatory by using Mylar and a hydrogen alpha filter; I wanted to see more of the features I had observed in the Crimea and I wanted to learn how the Sun evolves over time.

Now, I am a Royal Society University Research Fellow working at UCL's Mullard Space Science Laboratory where I study the evolution of immense magnetic structures in the Sun's atmosphere. These often erupt into the Solar System and can cause stormy 'space weather' if they reach the Earth. 

The lively astronomy community in the UK means that I am also often out giving talks at schools and to specialist interest groups. I greatly enjoy discussing the latest astronomical discoveries and finding out what people around the country are observing.

Related Links