Greensboro Lunch Counter Sit-ins

On 1 February 1960, four young black men began a protest in Greensboro, North Carolina against the racial segregation of shops and restaurants in the US southern states.

The men, who became known as the Greensboro Four, asked to be served at a lunch counter in Woolworths. When they were refused service they stayed until closing time. And went back the next day, and the next. Over the following days and months, this non-violent form of protest spread and many more people staged sit-ins at shops and restaurants.

Witness hears from one of the four men, Franklin McCain.

Available now

10 minutes

Last on

Tue 1 Feb 2011 11:50 GMT

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