The Mississippi Burning Case

Andrew Goodman was one of the three civil rights workers killed by the Klu Klux Klan in Mississippi in 1964. He and the other two victims, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, had been working on a project to register African-Americans to vote.

For Witness, Andrew's brother David recalls his brother's strong sense of justice and what his family lived through in the 44 days he was missing. He remembers how nationwide shock helped change America for good - and that it took the deaths of two white people to awake the conscience of middle America.

Picture: Andrew Goodman, Credit: Associated Press

Available now

10 minutes

Last on

Wed 4 Aug 2010 22:50 GMT

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