Image for Deadly desert

Deadly desert

Duration: 00:56

In the north of Africa's Great Rift Valley lies an extraordinary desert, unlike anywhere else on Earth. The cradle of mankind and home to our earliest ancestors, the Danakil Desert in Ethiopia is one of the most geologically active places on the planet. Volcanoes and earthquakes rip apart the ground in front of your very eyes. And it's officially the hottest place on Earth. Within this remote furnace temperatures can hit 60 degrees Celsius (145 degrees Fahrenheit), and there is almost no water. It should be devoid of life, but it's not. Somehow people live here - a legendarily tough, nomadic warrior tribe called the Afar.

Available since: Mon 14 Dec 2009

Credits

Presenter
Kate Humble
Presenter
Steve Leonard
Participant
Dr Mukal Agarwal
Participant
Dougal Jerram
Participant
Richard Wiese
Director
Rupert Smith
Producer
Richard Bradley
Key talent
Kate Humble
Key talent
Steve Leonard
Participant
Dr Mukal Agarwal
Participant
Dougal Jerram
Participant
Richard Wiese

This clip is from

Hottest Place on Earth Episode 1

1/2 A team of experts and explorers venture into the Danakil desert in Northern Ethiopia.

First broadcast: 19 Mar 2009

Image for Episode 1 Not currently available on BBC iPlayer

Featured in...

  • Wildlife Highlights 2009

    The most fantastic moments from a year of wildlife programming from the BBC.

  • Human Planet Explorer

    Clips from BBC programmes showcasing man's relationship with the natural environment.

  • BBC Nature

    Be captivated, informed and inspired by the world's wildlife.

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Added. Check out your playlist Dismiss