Joan Smith's Misogynies

Listen in pop-out player

It's been 25 years since the first publication of Joan Smith's book Misogynies. In 1989, this collection of essays created shock waves with its analyses of everything from Page 3, violence in films, women in the clergy and the bungled Yorkshire Ripper murder investigation. But how much have things really moved on in the past quarter century? Jenni talks to crime writer Val McDermid about the culture Misogynies sprang from and to Alex Clark about current feminist literature. Martin Daubney and Dr Claire Hardaker discuss the impact that online pornography and trolling have on society and we talk to a group of men about joining the fight against misogyny.

Available now

45 minutes

Last on

Thu 5 Jun 2014 10:00

Misogynies by Joan Smith: 25 Years On

It’s been 25 years since the first publication of Joan Smith’s book Misogynies. In 1989, this collection of essays created shock waves with its analyses of everything from Page 3, violence in films, women in the clergy and the bungled Yorkshire Ripper murder trial.  But how much have things really moved on in the past quarter Century?  Joan joins Jenni to investigate misogyny past and present.

The Cultural Background of Misogynies

The 1980s saw increases in female employment and women’s progress in the professions and more women went to university. It also saw a woman running the country, with Margaret Thatcher serving as Prime Minister for the entire decade. So why did it give rise to Joan’s concern with misogyny and why would a younger woman first encountering the book in the 90s find so much to identify with? Jenni talks to Joan Smith, author of Misogynies, to the writer and journalist Val McDermid and to journalist Sophie Heawood.

Who are the new wave of feminst writers?

As Misogynies by Joan Smith turns 25, the literary critic Alex Clark suggests recent and upcoming books which are on the crest of the fourth wave of feminism.  

Online Misogyny

Misogyny hit the headlines last week when student Elliot Rodger killed six people in California, shortly after publishing a women-hating manifesto online.  Despite his parents contacting the police with concerns prior to the mass murder, they felt any action against Rodger was unnecessary.  So how seriously should we take online misogyny?  Jenni talks to journalist Martin Daubney and Dr Claire Hardaker about whether online activity, from trolling to violent pornography, reflects misogyny in society, or if it perpetuates the problem. 

Teaching boys about gender equality

Great Men Value Women is an initiative which is all about engaging young men and boys in gender equality. The charity is organising men, like former rapper and stand-up comedian Doc Brown, to visit schools and run workshops exploring gender issues.  Felicity Finch went to the Kelmscott Secondary School in East London to see Doc Brown in action.

Who Are The Men Joining The Fight Against Misogyny?

How has the relationship between men and the women’s movement changed since the publication of Misogynies in 1989? In the aftermath of the Elliot Rodger shootings, thousands of men shared their support for women's experiences of misogyny in the #YesAllWomen twitter campaign. And a new generation of men are joining the fight against misogyny. But no matter how much a man supports the women’s movement – can he actually call himself a feminist?  Jenni is joined by Ally Fogg, who writes on men’s issues and feminism for The Guardian and student, blogger and male feminist Lewis Merryweather.

Credits

Role Contributor
PresenterJenni Murray
Interviewed GuestJoan Smith
Interviewed GuestVal McDermid
Interviewed GuestAlex Clark
Interviewed GuestMartin Daubney
Interviewed GuestClaire Hardaker
Interviewed GuestAlly Fogg

Woman's Hour Chore Wars

Woman's Hour Chore Calculator - Promo

How equal is your household? Calculate the division of responsibilities in your home.

Woman's Hour Power List 2014 – Game Changers

Doreen Lawrence

Doreen Lawrence is named number one game changer.

Woman's Hour Takeover

Woman's Hour Takeover

Five remarkable women take over Woman's Hour for one week.

Added. Check out your playlist Dismiss