Daniel Harding, Faure Songs, Poulenc

Tom Service talks to conductor Daniel Harding; also a discussion with French music experts about a book compiling Poulenc's articles and interviews, as well as a preview of his opera Dialogue des Carmélites opening this month at the Royal Opera House in London, with contributions from director Robert Carsen and singers Sally Matthews and Sophie Koch. Also, we talk to Roy Howat and Emily Kilpatrick about a new edition of Fauré's songs they've been working on.

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45 minutes

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Sat 24 May 2014 12:15

Daniel Harding

Daniel Harding

Daniel Harding made his professional conducting debut 20 years ago and this summer returns to the BBC Proms to conduct Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 with the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra, where he is Music Director.

Born in Oxford, Harding began his career assisting Sir Simon Rattle at the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra before going on to work with Claudio Abbado at the Berlin Philharmonic. He has since conducted some of the leading orchestra’s across Europe and the US; including the London Symphony Orchestra, where he is Principal Guest Conductor.

Daniel spoke to Tom Service about the difficult half-century he’s going through in his career – the conductor’s long, long equivalent of second album syndrome -  not being a young prodigy any more, but not yet being a venerated, venerable master; about the need to stick to what composers say in scores, and about his collaborations with the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra and the LSO.

More information:

Daniel Harding

Daniel Harding conducts the LSO on 3rd July at St Paul’s Cathedral

Hear that concert live on Radio 3’s Live in Concert

Daniel Harding conducts Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 the BBC Proms

 

 

 

 

Poulenc: ‘Dialogues des Carmelites’ at the Royal Opera House

Poulenc: ‘Dialogues des Carmelites’ at the Royal Opera House

During the French Revolution, in June 1794, sixteen Carmelite nuns from Compiègne were sent to the guillotine and executed after being found guilty of resisting Revolutionary patriotism. In the early-1950s Francis Poulenc saw a play based on this real event, and when it was suggested to him that he turn it into an opera he set to work enthusiastically. It was premiered at La Scala in 1957 and first came to Covent Garden a year later.

This new 2014 production of Dialogues des Carmelites at the Royal Opera House features a cast including Sally Matthews, Anna Prohaska and Emma Bell, conducted by Sir Simon Rattle.  Director Robert Carsen spoke to Music Matters about the origins of the piece, the role that Poulenc’s personal struggle with faith plays, spiritual love and the meaning of martyrdom and death.

More information:

Royal Opera House – Dialogues des Carmelites

Hear this production live from the Royal Opera House on BBC Radio 3 on 7th June from 6:45pm

 

Francis Poulenc: Articles and Interviews - Book review

Francis Poulenc: Articles and Interviews - Book review

A collection of interviews and articles written by Francis Poulenc has been translated into English by Roger Nichols, and released now for the first time. The book, which was originally edited and published by Nicholas Southon in French, captures the composer’s lively writing style, as well as his views on music and his contemporaries.

Tom Service speaks to musicologists Graham Johnson and Richard Langham Smith about what this new collection tells us about Poulenc the composer, and man of his time.

More information:

Francis Poulenc: Articles and Interviews

Hear Poulenc’s opera Les Mamelles de Tirésias  in Live in Concert on Saturday 24th May

 

 


 

Fauré songs

Fauré songs

Gabriel Fauré composed over 100 songs between 1861 and 1921, producing the biggest single body of work in the genre by a French composer. The first complete critical edition of these songs is soon to be published, with volume 1 (which includes the first 34 songs, up to op.27 in 1882) due out in the next couple of weeks.

Roy Howat and Emily Kilpatrick have spent the last five years researching and editing Fauré’s songs which are now central to any conservatoire repertoire. They found that due to an erratic publication history, with works dispersed across many different publishers and collections, many of the songs had misprints and conflicting markings across different printed editions.  As a result some songs will now sound quite different to how we have previously heard them, something which Roy and Emily demonstrate in the studio with soprano Anna Sideris, a post-graduate student from the Royal Academy of Music.

More information:

Volume 1 of Fauré’s complete songs is due out soon

Find out more about this research project.

Roy Howat

Credits

Role Contributor
PresenterTom Service
Interviewed GuestDaniel Harding
Interviewed GuestRobert Carsen
Interviewed GuestSally Matthews
Interviewed GuestRoy Howat
Interviewed GuestEmily Kilpatrick