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Katy B; Why we cheat on our partners; Growing up in care

Duration:
58 minutes
First broadcast:
Monday 10 February 2014

Katy B's back with a brand new album Little Red - the long awaited follow up to her hugely popular debut On a Mission. She talks to Jane Garvey about "growing up" her career so far and performs "Crying For No Reason" from the album live in the Woman's Hour Studio.

It's estimated that more than a 100,000 women served as nurses in WW1, often on the Front Line. One, Elsie Knocker, was a British nurse who joined the Belgian army, setting up an advance first aid post in the cellar of a house close to the fighting. Later known as Baroness de T'Serclaes, she described her war work when talking to Woman's Hour in 1964 . Plus we look at the trauma nurses experienced as a result of serving at the front.

Over 30 years ago, aged just 9 Jenny Molloy walked into a London Police Station with her younger brothers and asked to be taken into care. Referring to herself as a 'care leaver in recovery' Jenny, now a grandmother, talks about growing up in children's homes but still visiting her alcoholic parents and the impact that's had on her as an adult. And we explore the importance, or not, of keeping links with your birth family.

Plus Why Men REALLY Cheat: The Psychological Secrets of Male Infidelity. Is your man a "Chameleon" or a "Manipulator". By identifying which category your partner fits is it possible to understand why they're cheating or even perhaps to avoid getting involved with them in the first place. Is it possible pre-empt an affair? Does the same mixture of psychological and environmental factors encourage women to cheat too?

Presented by Jane Garvey.
Edited and Produced by Beverley Purcell.

Chapters

4 items
  • Growing Up in Care

    At the age of 9 Jenny Molloy walked into a police station and asked to be taken into care

  • Katy B

    The singer performs live and talks about her career, fame and her musical dad

  • WW1: Nursing on the Front Line

    The experiences of the women who served in the Great War

  • Why Men Really Cheat

    Author Martyn Stewart identifies the 27 different types of men who are unfaithful

  • Growing Up in Care

    In 1983, at the age of nine Jenny Molloy walked into Stoke Newington Police Station with her two younger brothers and asked to be taken into care. Referring to herself as a ‘care leaver in recovery’ Jenny, now a grandmother, joins Jane Garvey to talk about growing up in children’s homes with regular visits to her alcoholic parents and the impact on her adult life. Independent social worker, Joanna Nicolas, joins them to explore the importance, or not, to keep links with their birth family if children are fostered.

  • Katy B

    Singer Katy B is back with a brand new album, Little Red - the long-awaited follow up to her hugely popular debut, On A Mission. She talks to Jane Garvey about her music, the BRIT school,  her musical dad, and how fame can get in the way of getting on the bus these days. And she performs a beautiful new version of her single, Crying For No Reason, with piano, live in the Woman's Hour studio.

    Little Red is out today on Columbia Records

  • WW1: Nursing on the Front Line

    It’s estimated that more than a hundred thousand women served as nurses in World War One, often on the Front Line. One, Elsie Knocker, was a British nurse who joined the Belgian army, setting up an advance first aid post in the cellar of a house close to the fighting. Later known as Baroness de T'Serclaes, she described her war work when talking to Woman’s Hour in 1964. You can hear that interview, which is available as part of our archive collection and also as part of Woman's Hour World War One: Women and the War collection.

     

    Joining Jane to discuss the trauma nurses experienced as a result of serving at the front is Professor Christine Hallett, Director of the UK Centre for the History of Nursing and Midwifery, and also historical adviser to the forthcoming BBC One drama about WW1 nurses, The Crimson Field.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww1

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/ww1

     

  • Why Men Really Cheat

    In an attempt to get to the root of male infidelity, Martyn Stewart identifies 27 different types of men in his book “Why Men Really Cheat: The Psychological Secrets of Male Infidelity”.  He claims these categories, including “The Chameleon” and “The Manipulator” are influenced by a mixture of psychological and environmental factors and that, in placing men into these categories, women can better understand both the reason for male infidelity and how to avoid unfaithful men.  But is it possible pre-empt an affair?  And do the same influences encourage women to cheat too?  Jane speaks to Martyn Stewart and to author Kate Figes.

Credits

Presenter
Jane Garvey
Interviewed Guest
Katy B
Interviewed Guest
Christine Hallett
Interviewed Guest
Jenny Molloy
Interviewed Guest
Joanna Nicolas
Interviewed Guest
Martyn Stewart
Interviewed Guest
Kate Figes
Producer
Beverley Purcell
Editor
Beverley Purcell

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