Today, 08/01/2014 Today's running order

8 Jan 2014 Last updated at 12:28

Wednesday 8 January

With John Humphrys and Sarah Montague.
  • 8 Jan 2014 12:22:56

    Highlights

    Clips from this morning's programme:

  • 8 Jan 2014 07:00:18

    Internet puzzle

    A new version of Cicada 3301 – a complex collection of anonymously-set puzzles - has begun. Kenny Paterson, a professor of cryptography at Royal Holloway, University of London, examines.

  • 8 Jan 2014 06:50:54

    Today's running order

    Subject to change

    0615

    Business news with Simon Jack.

    -          The BBC's chief business correspondent Linda Yueh and Miranda Carr, head of China research at North Square Blue Oak, discuss the economic problems caused by China’s debt.

    -          The state pension age for men and women should rise to 68 by January 2023 - a decade earlier than the plans currently set out by the Chancellor - the Institute of Economic Affairs suggest. Gabriel Sahlgren, the author of the report, discusses.

     

    0650

    A new version of Cicada 3301 – a complex collection of anonymously-set puzzles - has begun. Kenny Paterson, a professor of cryptography at Royal Holloway, University of London, examines.

     

    0709

    Four people were killed when a US air force (USAF) helicopter crashed during a "low-level" training exercise. Photographer Brian Egan, who captured the two helicopters flying just hours before the crash, and aviation expert Chris Yates speak to presenter John Humphrys.


    0718

    Voters should have to show photographic ID when they go to a polling station to vote, the Electoral Commission has recommended. Its chair Jenny Watson explains.

     

    0722

    Business news with Simon Jack. Justin King, the Sainsbury’s chief executive, discusses the supermarket’s latest sales figures.

     

    0725

    The first consignment of Syrian chemical weapons materials has left the country on a Danish ship. Michael Luhan, chairman of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), examines.

     

    0736

    An investigation by the British Medical Journal has found that since the current government came to power it has had met with the drinks industry on 130 separate occasions. Jane Ellison, Conservative MP for Battersea, examines.

     

    0740

    The paper review.

     

    0745

    This year’s BAFTA nominations are set to be announced. The BBC’s arts editor Will Gompertz reports.

     

    0748

    Thought for the Day, with Akhandadhi Das - a Vaishnav Hindu teacher and theologian.

     

    0752

    Labour is to force a vote in Parliament on its plans to give councils the power to ban high-stakes roulette machines from bookmakers' shops. Neil Goulden, chairman of the Association of British Bookmakers, and Matt Zarb-Cousin, a former addict of the machines, discuss.

     

    0810

    Prof Jeremy Farrar, the director of the Wellcome Trust, has warned of the threat posed by the emergence of infections - such as TB and malaria - that have become resistant to antibiotics. The Today programme’s Sima Kotecha reports; plus Mr Farrar speaks to presenter John Humphrys.

     

    0820

    The French President Francois Hollande has written to local authorities in France urging them to ban the controversial comedian Dieudonne on public order grounds. French philosopher Bernard Henri-Levy analyses.

     

    0833

    Syria is now believed to have become the scene of the single biggest wave of kidnappings in modern journalism. The Today programme’s Tom Bateman reports.

     

    0846

    Matt Novak, the man behind Gizmodo's Paleofuture blog, discusses the predictions made by science fiction writer Isaac Asimov 50 years ago, regarding cars in 2014.

     

    0850

    Business news with Simon Jack. Jerome Booth, an emerging markets economist and financier, analyses the further slumps predicted in emerging market assets.

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