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Episode 19

Sunday Morning Live, Series 4 Episode 19 of 20

Should there be leniency for soldiers who commit crimes in conflict zones?

A British sergeant, known only as Marine A, is awaiting sentence after being convicted of shooting an Afghan insurgent who had been taken prisoner. The chief of the defence staff, General Sir Nick Houghton, has called it a 'heinous' crime and said it would be 'quite wrong' for the armed services to expect special treatment from the law. But some other former army officers have called for leniency. Major General Julian Thompson, the commander of land forces in the Falklands conflict, says that the unique pressures and stresses of war should be taken into account in sentencing. Falklands veteran Simon Weston joins the debate.

Are we neglecting the countryside?

Prince Charles marked his 65th birthday by speaking out passionately about our attitudes to the British countryside. Acting as guest editor of Country Life magazine, he said: 'The countryside's contribution to the national good has to be cherished and sustained.' Are we neglecting the countryside in favour of cities? The Reverend Peter Owen Jones, a village dweller, shares Prince Charles's concerns and debates the issue with other members of the panel.

Should we punish ourselves for being selfish?

Former government minister Ann Widdecombe is not someone you would regard as the shy retiring type. As a longstanding MP, she enjoyed the stage of the House of Commons and since then has become a star act in Strictly Come Dancing and appeared in panto and opera. But now she says we've become too self-centred and wants us all to think about penance and penitence. That's the subject of her new book 'Sackcloth and Ashes'. Sangita Myska interviews Ann for Sunday Morning Live to find out more - and the panel discuss whether the world has become too selfish.

Release date:

1 hour

Last on

Sun 17 Nov 2013 10:00

This week's programme

On Sunday Morning Live: should a Marine sergeant who shot an Afghan prisoner be given a lenient sentence? Falklands veteran Simon Weston gives his view.  And, former Government minister and Strictly Come Dancing star Ann Widdecombe on why we’ve become the selfish  `me-generation`

Also joining Samira Ahmed this week: former BBC Royal Correspondent Jennie Bond; vicar and environmental campaigner, the Rev Peter Owen Jones; and radio talk show host Nick Ferrari.

Should there be leniency for soldiers who commit crimes in conflict?

A sergeant, known only as Marine A, is awaiting sentence after being convicted of shooting an Afghan insurgent who had been taken as a prisoner. 

The Chief of the Defence Staff, General Sir Nick Houghton, has called it a “heinous” crime and said it would be “quite wrong” for the armed services to expect special treatment from the law. But some other former Army officers have called for leniency. 

Major General Julian Thompson, the commander of land forces in the Falklands conflict, says that the unique pressures and stresses of war should be taken into account in sentencing. 

What do you think? That’s the subject of our first debate this week - and the question for our viewer vote: Should there be leniency for soldiers who commit crimes in conflict? 

You can give your view online now and by text during the programme.

Are we neglecting the countryside?

Prince Charles became an old age pensioner this week and marked his 65th birthday by speaking out passionately about our attitudes to the British countryside. 

Acting as guest editor of Country Life magazine, he said: “The countryside’s contribution to the national good has to be cherished and sustained.” 

The question for our second debate: Are we neglecting the countryside?

The Reverend Peter Owen Jones, a village dweller, shares Prince Charles’ concerns and debates the issue with other members of the panel.

Should we punish ourselves for being selfish?

Former Government minister Ann Widdecombe is not someone you would regard as the shy retiring type. As a longstanding MP, she enjoyed the stage of the House of Commons and since then has become a star act in Strictly Come Dancing and a panto character,`Widdy-in-Waiting’. But now she says we’ve become too selfish and wants us all to think about penance and penitence.

That’s the subject of her new book `Sackcloth and Ashes'. 

Sangita Myska interviews Ann for Sunday Morning Live to find out more – and the panel discuss whether the world has become too self-centred.

Credits

Role Contributor
PresenterSamira Ahmed
Series EditorDave Stanford
ProducerNeil Dimmock
ParticipantJennie Bond
ParticipantNick Ferrari
ParticipantPeter Owen-Jones
Interviewed GuestAnn Widdecombe
Interviewed GuestSimon Weston