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22/10/2013

Duration:
3 hours
First broadcast:
Tuesday 22 October 2013

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

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  1. Image for Best of Today

    Best of Today

    Insight, analysis and expert debate as key policy makers are challenged on the latest news stories.

In today’s programme...

With Sarah Montague and Mishal Husain.

  • 22 Oct 2013 11:33:47

    Highlights

    Listen to clips from this morning's programme below:

  • 22 Oct 2013 07:53:52

    WWI

    History has left many us images that illustrate the destructive legacy of WWI but there is almost a  total absence of recorded sound - particularly from the field of battle. The Today programme's Tom Bateman met musician Stuart Staples, from the British band The Tindersticks, who has been asked to compose a soundscape for the war museum at Ypres in Belgium.


  • 22 Oct 2013 07:02:54

    Papers

    Here's a round-up of this morning's newspaper headlines.

  • 22 Oct 2013 07:02:45

    Today's running order

    Subject to change

    0615

    Business news with Simon Jack on news that the latest non-farm role jobs data will come out in the US later - the first significant data to come out since the 16-day shutdown and will be keenly watched. Plus, Outstanding, a networking group for gay and lesbian business professionals, are publishing their first-ever top 50 most inspiring lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender boardroom professionals in an attempt to promote diversity and honesty.


    0709

    Up to £500m could be recovered from overseas visitors' and migrants' use of the NHS every year, ministers have said. Dr Chaand Nagpaul, who chairs the BMA's GP committee, reacts to the news and Jeremy Hunt, Heath Secretary, explains that the figure represents a quarter of the costs of treating such patients.


    0715

    It is the final of Great British Bake Off later and as many as eight million people in the UK are expected to tune in. TV critic India Ross and Radio 4's Martha Kearney, who competed herself in the Comic Relief version, discuss the programme's popularity.


    0721

    Business news with Simon Jack on news that the head of the Co-op Group has confirmed that the mutual organisation will lose overall control of the Co-op Bank as a result of a rescue deal.


    0724

    The case of the little girl known as Maria, found living in Greece with a Roma couple who were not her parents, has had a lot of attention across Europe in recent days. Mike Thomson, the Today programme's foreign correspondent, explains that there are fears it may increase prejudice against the Roma community with allegations of a trade in children.


    0733

    The energy regulator Ofgem will announce a major fine later. Sarah Harrison, a senior partner at Ofgem, explains that the fine comes at a time that energy prices are increasingly politicised with immense concern about bills rising.


    0738

    The paper review.


    0741

    History has left many us images that illustrate the destructive legacy of WWI but there is almost a  total absence of recorded sound - particularly from the field of battle. The Today programme's Tom Bateman met musician Stuart Staples, from the British band The Tindersticks, who has been asked to compose a soundscape for the war museum at Ypres in Belgium.


    0746

    Thought for the day with Bishop James Jones.


    0749

    Half the permanent workforce at the Grangemouth complex have rejected new terms and conditions proposed by Ineos, union officials have said. Will Hutton, chair of the Big Innovation Centre at the Work Foundation and author of The State We're In, and Sir Nicholas Scheele, former chief operating officer of Ford Motor Company and Former Chancellor of Warwick University, discuss the future of the plant.


    0810

    Arab and Western foreign ministers are to meet Syrian opposition officials in London in an effort to persuade them to attend the next round of peace talks. The BBC's Jim Muir reports and Foreign Secretary William Hague discusses what needs to be done if peace talks are to succeed.


    0817

    50 years ago the National Theatre Company was born at the Old Vic and the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh are due to visit the National Theatre later on Tuesday. Rosemary Harris, an actress who was Ophelia in original production of Hamlet opposite Peter O'Toole, reflects on the history and significance of the National Theatre.


    0822

    In the years since the Taliban were toppled, one of the notable changes in Afghanistan, especially in urban areas, has been a boom in the media market, especially television. Filmmaker Eva Orner and Dawood Azami from BBC Afghan discuss the country's first uncensored television network.


    0835

    Business news with Simon Jack.


    0840

    In America in 1931, nine teenagers were falsely accused of raping two girls on a train in Alabama: the accused were black and the alleged victims were white. Eight of the nine 'Scottsboro Boys' received death-sentences, though none was ever executed. The case became a famous milestone in American civil rights and the story has inspired a musical, opening this week at the Young Vic in London. The daughter of Clarence Norris, who died 24 years ago, has only now given her first interview since his death. The BBC's Vincent Dowd reports.


    0845

    A national endeavour to create an NHS genetic database begins later. Professor Mark Caulfield, the chief scientist for Genomics England, explains that the ultimate ambition is to sequence the genomes of 100,000 NHS patients to help what is sometimes called a 'genetic odyssey' to diagnose disease.


    0850

    On 24 October 1963, Lord Robbins published his report on higher education. Historian Juliet Gardiner and Claire Callender, professor of Higher Education at Birkbeck Institute of Education, remember that it lead to an expansion of new universities as numbers were increased and former technical colleges became universities.

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