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Jacey Normand explores the Ribble Valley food trail and asks if going back to basics is the only way to ensure our food is safe to eat. Food writer Jay Rayner investigates whether our food industry is being effectively policed and how confident we can be that what we are buying is what is described on the tin, and Dianne Oxberry goes shrimping off the coast of Southport to find out why the industry is in decline.

Release date:

29 minutes

Last on

Mon 14 Oct 2013 19:30
BBC One North West

Horse meat scandal 'could happen again'

Horse meat scandal 'could happen again'

A drop in the number of food samples sent for testing could lead to a repeat of the horsemeat scandal, an expert has told BBC Inside Out.

 

Food writer Jay Rayner examines the food standards system to find out how confident we can be that the food we eat is what we think it is. 

 

Read the news story and watch the video feature on the BBC News website.

Ribble Valley food model for UK farming?

Ribble Valley food model for UK farming?

Ribble valley in Lancashire has been fighting to restore consumer confidence in its products since the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in 2001.

 

It has introduced a unique system of food production which aims to transform thinking about food by emphasising trust and provenance. Could this be a model for the rest of the UK?

 

Watch the video feature on the BBC News website.

Meet the last shrimpers

Meet the last shrimpers

Inside Out meets the last shrimpers who fish off the coast of Southport in Merseyside.

 

Presenter Dianne Oxberry joins them to find out how the famous potted brown shrimps go from source to plate.

  

Watch the video feature on the BBc News website.

Credits

Role Contributor
PresenterDianne Oxberry
ReporterJacey Normand
ReporterJay Rayner
Executive ProducerDeborah Van Bishop

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