Today, 09/10/2013 In today's programmes...

9 Oct 2013 Last updated at 10:14

Wednesday 9 October

With Sarah Montague and John Humphrys.
  • 9 Oct 2013 11:13:01

    Leveson

    A senior newspaper executive has said the press could consider taking legal action in the European courts to stop new press regulation from being introduced. Actor Hugh Grant gives his reactions to the news.
    Listen to the interview:
  • 9 Oct 2013 07:43:06

    Public services

    Five years of austerity since the banking bail-out and a new poll for the BBC suggests people think many services have actually improved. The BBC's home affairs editor Mark Easton outlines the possible reasons behind the trend:

  • 9 Oct 2013 06:47:58

    Papers

    Here's a round-up of this morning's newspaper headlines:


    Our newsreader this morning is Corrie Corfield, who has just tweeted this picture from the studio:

    05.10. Staring at a whopping windshield and ready for the off : )
  • 9 Oct 2013 07:02:00

    Today's running order

    Subject to change

    0615

    Business news with Simon Jack on news that President Obama will later nominate the current deputy head of the US Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen, to succeed Ben Bernanke as head when his term ends in January. Plus - the IMF's Olivier Blanchard has defended his decision to raise the UK's growth forecast six months ago, saying George Osborne's austerity programme was "playing with fire".

     

    0709

    A report has found failings in the government's £500m "e-borders" scheme to gather information on passenger movements in and out of the UK. Chief inspector of borders, John Vine, explains why the scheme has not worked.

     

    0713

    Thousands of Islamist extremists in the UK see the British public as a legitimate target for attacks, the director general of MI5 has warned. The BBC's security correspondent Gordon Correra reports.

     

    0716

    Business news with Simon Jack. The government has announced a change to regulated rail fare price rises in England.

     

    0719

    When Tommy Robinson, the leader of the English Defence League, unexpectedly quit the group yesterday, he claimed democracy was now the best way to combat Islamic extremism. The Today programme's Tom Bateman reports.

     

    0723

    Governments forced to rescue the world's banking system are being warned there will be no bailout if there is a crisis in the Earth's climate system. Angel Gurria. the secretary general of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) explains that he will be giving a speech in London today accusing countries of complacency.

     

    0734

    Five years of austerity since the banking bail-out and a new poll for the BBC suggests people think many services have actually improved. The Today programme's Joanna Humphreys reports and The BBC's home affairs editor Mark Easton outlines the possible reasons behind the trend.

     

    0741

    The paper review.

     

    0744

    In the run-up to the Man Booker prize that will be announced next week, the Today programme will be hearing from the six authors who have been selected for the shortlist. The BBC's arts correspondent Rebecca Jones hears from Eleanor Catton, who was brought up in New Zealand, and the only British author on the list, Jim Crace.

     

    0748

    Thought for the Day with the writer Rhidian Brook.

     

    0751

    A senior newspaper executive has said the press could consider taking legal action in the European courts to stop new press regulation from being introduced. The Today programme hears reactions to the news.

     

    0810

    Thousands of Islamist extremists in the UK see the British public as a legitimate target for attacks, the director general of MI5 has warned. Henry Porter, author and journalist, and Charlie Edwards, director of National Security and Resilience Studies at RUSI, discuss the potential level of threat.

     

    0820

    The question "What is art for?" is being addressed in two books out this month from leading thinkers. Desmond Morris, one of the pioneers of popular science, and bestselling author, Alain de Botton, discuss the content of their new books.

     

    0830

    Newspapers could take legal action in the European courts to prevent new press regulations coming into force, a senior industry figure has said. Bob Satchwell, executive director of the Society of Editors, gives his reaction to the news.

     

    0835

    It is being claimed the multi-million pound "e-borders" scheme, to monitor how many foreign nationals are coming in and out of the UK, is not working as well as it should. Immigration Minister Mark Harper talks about the improvements that could be made.

     

    0840

    Business news with Simon Jack on news that cocoa prices hit new highs yesterday, following forecasts of a deficit in the next four years from the International Cocoa Organisation.

     

    0843

    The company carrying out the badger culls in Somerset wants more time to complete the task. National Farmers' Union president, Peter Kendall, and Rosie Woodroffe, of the Zoological Society of London, debate the efficacy of the cull.

     

    0850

    Last week it was announced that the 2022 World Cup in Qatar may be moved to the winter. Reverend Giles Fraser imagines life if Christmas were held in the summer in the UK.

     

    0851

    The BBC has commissioned a survey to ascertain how people think our public services have been affected by the financial crisis and the results are quite surprising. David Willetts, Universities and Science Minister, and Nicola Smith, TUC chief economist and head of social affairs, discuss the state of public services in the UK.

D-Day Reports

Benedict Cumberbatch

Benedict Cumberbatch, Patrick Stewart and Toby Jones read the BBC's D-Day news reports.

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