iPlayer Radio What's New?
Image for 17/09/2013

Listen now 28 mins

Listen in pop-out player

17/09/2013

Duration:
28 minutes
First broadcast:
Tuesday 17 September 2013

Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by Dr Matt Pope from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London and from Luton by Mark Thomas who is Professor of Evolutionary Genetics at University College London.

Today's programme has just a touch of Disney. But we're not at the movies - rather under the English Channel, exploring the role played by Dumbo, Bambi and Pluto in the Allied invasion of France in 1944 and finding out that these pipelines might not have been as successful in delivering fuel after the invasion of France than the history books tell us.

We explore the history of milk. It's something that we take for granted but, in fact, the ability to drink milk into adulthood is something that only some 35% of humans possess. Its origins lie in a genetic mutation that first began spreading through Europe some 7,500 years ago. The consequences were far-reaching - Europe's very first revolution. The hunter-gatherer lifestyle that had dominated the continent since the first arrival of Cro-Magnon man was swept away, and an imprint stamped on diet and population that is still evident to this day. Mark Thomas has recently explored this fusion of genetics and archaeology in Nature Magazine.

We head to Wiltshire to study records from nearly two centuries ago which show that, back then even more than today, the debate about welfare was as much about morality as economics.

And we hear about a new project devoted to the First World War, which could give a whole new meaning to bible studies.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

  • Programme Guests

    Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by Dr Matt Pope from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London and from Luton by Mark Thomas who is Professor of Evolutionary Genetics at University College London.
  • History of Milk in Europe

    We take history of milk for granted but, in fact, the ability to drink milk into adulthood is something that only some 35% of humans possess. Its origins lie in a genetic mutation that first began spreading through Europe some 7,500 years ago. The consequences were far-reaching – Europe's very first revolution. The hunter-gatherer lifestyle that had dominated the continent since the first arrival there of Cro-Magnon man was swept away, and an imprint stamped on diet and population that is still evident to this day. Mark Thomas has recently explored this fusion of genetics and archaeology and an article in Nature Magazine pulls together all the work that's been done on this.

  • PLUTO

    PLUTO - Photo by Dr Robert Liddiard

    We explore the role played by Dumbo, Bambi and Pluto in the Allied invasion of France in 1944. It's widely thought that this network of pipelines successfully delivered fuel to the Allies after the invasion of France. But, Making History listener Tim Whittle who worked on the Government's Pipeline and Storage System for over 20 years, thinks not. He has established that only 8% of the fuel the invasion forces needed came through the PLUTO pipelines and that they didn't really work properly until VE Day on 1945. Dr Robert Liddiard from UEA went to hear the evidence.

     

    BBC People's War 
    Greatstone
    Dr Robert Liddiard

     

    (Photo credits: PLUTO pipelines - by Dr Robert Liddiard)

  • PLUTO pipelines

    PLUTO

     

  • The Second Poor

    Minety Second Poor - LtoR Dr Samantha Shave, Helen Castor and Charles Cook at Minety church.  © Nick Patrick


    Making History listener Charles Cook has recently been elected to Minety Parish Council in Wiltshire  and the documentary evidence from its past fascinates him. In particular, he is intrigued by the enigmatic phrase: ‘the Second Poor’ which he has found in the records of a parish charity. Helen Castor and historian Dr Samantha Shave from the University of Cambridge went to meet him.

     

    Dr Shave explained that the Second Poor really refers to what might also be known as the deserving poor, i.e. those people of good behaviour and the right values who might qualify for extra welfare from a charity as well as from Poor Relief.


    An example of how Poor Relief worked in a parish can be found in the village of Rooksbridge in Somerset.


    BBC History

     

    (Photo: Minety Second Poor - LtoR Dr Samantha Shave, Helen Castor and Charles Cook at Minety church.  © Nick Patrick)

  • First World War Bibles

    Do you have a bible from the First World War? The Bible Society is trying to trace some of the thousands it gave to troops between 1914 and 1918 in a project that will assess how they were used, what part faith played in the conflict and what they can tell us about the experience of soldiers.

Broadcasts

Free download

  1. Image for Making History

    Making History

    Making History explores ordinary people's links with the past. The programme is presented by Helen…

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Added. Check out your playlist Dismiss