Meg Rosoff; Women's cricket; Mossarat Qadeem; Anya von Bremzen

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Carnegie Medal winning author Meg Rosoff discusses her 6th novel, Picture Me Gone.

Charlotte Edwards and Katherine Brunt on their Women's Ashes win.

Peace activist Mossarat Qadeem on her work de-radicalising Pakistani youths. She discusses how to steer them away from extremist groups such as the Taliban and involve them in education and employment.

Food writer Anya von Bremzen has written her memoirs which look at the history of twentieth century Russia and the food that typified Soviet society.

And our series looking at Medieval Women begins today with Christina of Markyate.

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58 minutes

Last on

Wed 4 Sep 2013 10:00

Mossarat Qadeem

Mossarat Qadeem is a peace activist who is fighting extremism in Pakistan one child at a time. She works directly with the mothers of radicalized youths to steer their sons away from extremist groups such as the Taliban and into education and employment. A political scientist, she left academia to set up an organisation called PAIMAN, meaning Promise, focusing on young men who are vulnerable to militancy. She joins Jenni to discuss how she changes the minds of potential suicide bombers, and why she thinks working at a grass roots level is key to preventing the growth of extremism in Pakistan.

 

England Women’s Cricket Team

On Saturday the England Women’s Cricket Team won a historic victory over Australia to regain the Ashes. We speak to England Captain Charlotte Edwards and team mate Katherine Brunt about their achievement and the state of the women's game.

Soviet Cooking

Food writer Anya von Bremzen grew up in Moscow in a communal apartment where eighteen families shared one kitchen, yet despite the cramped cooking conditions, it is the food her mother made there that she most fondly remembers. She has written her memoirs, which look at the history of twentieth century Russia and the food that typified Soviet society.

Mastering the Art of Soviet Cookery is published by Transworld Books

Medieval Women - Christina of Markyate

Christina of Markyate was a medieval woman who went to great lengths to pursue her goal in life, rebelling against her family and the conventions of her day. Born at the end of the 11th century, Christina, who was originally called Theodora, made a vow of chastity at an early age, against the wishes of her parents who wanted her to marry. Forced into wedlock, she then fled in disguise and went into hiding. Christina became a religious recluse and eventually founded a priory of nuns attached to St. Albans. Dr Louise Wilkinson of Canterbury Christ Church University explores her life.

 

The St Albans Psalter Project

 

Meg Rosoff

Carnegie Medal winning author Meg Rosoff  talks about her 6th novel, Picture Me Gone. Told from the perspective of 12 year old Mila it is the tale of lies and detection, because Mila has a gift: she can read a room, a person, a situation, and tell if you are happy, or pregnant or having an affair. It explores the difference between how adults and children view the world, and tells of the bond between a father and his daughter as they embark on an epic road trip to solve the mystery of a man’s disappearance.

 

Picture Me Gone by Meg Rosoff is published 5th September (Hardback) by Penguin

 

 

 

Credits

Role Contributor
PresenterJenni Murray
Interviewed GuestMeg Rosoff
Interviewed GuestCharlotte Edwards
Interviewed GuestKatherine Brunt
Interviewed GuestMossarat Qadeem
Interviewed GuestAnya von Bremzen

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