Tom Robinson; Inheritance Tracks of Django Bates

Richard Coles and Suzy Klein entertain musician and broadcaster, Tom Robinson, hear the Inheritance Tracks of Django Bates, meet Simon Hood who cycled to every York City Football Club match over a whole season and Nina Wilson who cycled to every town and village in Norfolk, examine the allure of beer with beer sommelier Jane Peyton, talk to the last surviving British 'Dam Buster' George 'Johnny' Johnson and immerse themselves in the genteel atmosphere of Morecambe as JP Devlin meets people from the town for a Saturday Live 'Crowdscape'

Producer: Chris Wilson.

Release date:

Available now

1 hour, 28 minutes

Last on

Sat 17 Aug 2013 09:00

STUDIO GUEST :: TOM ROBINSON

STUDIO GUEST :: TOM ROBINSON

Tom Robinson is a broadcaster & songwriter. As a recording artist he has released 14 albums since 1978. As a broadcaster he began hosting his own radio show on the BBC World Service in 1985. He now hosts a show on BBC Radio 6 Music with a particular emphasis on new and emerging artists.

 

Tom's weekly 6 Music radio show.

INHERITANCE TRACKS :: DJANGO BATES

INHERITANCE TRACKS :: DJANGO BATES

Multi-instrumentalist and band leader Django Bates inherits Charlie Parker’s 'My Little Suede Shoes' and passes on Django Bates’ 'Interval Song'.

 

Django will be performing at the Proms on 28 August 2013.

CROWDSCAPE :: MORECAMBE

CROWDSCAPE :: MORECAMBE

JP Devlin chats to the people on Morecambe promenade.

 

Morecambe Town Council

BEER SOMMELIER :: JANE PEYTON

BEER SOMMELIER :: JANE PEYTON

With beer festival season in full swing, we talk to beer sommelier Jane Peyton about why we’re seeing a golden age of British beer. 

 

 

TRAVEL :: SIMON HOOD AND NINA WILSON

TRAVEL :: SIMON HOOD AND NINA WILSON

Two intrepid cyclists tell of their forays into the heart of England. Nina Wilson has ridden to every village and town in Norfolk and Suffolk and Simon Hood explains in his book 'Bicycle Kicks' how he pedalled his way to every York City match, home and away, for a season.

 

More about Simon. 

 

 

 

LAST BRITISH DAMBUSTER :: GEORGE 'JOHNNY' JOHNSON

LAST BRITISH DAMBUSTER :: GEORGE 'JOHNNY' JOHNSON

George 'Johnny' Johnson is the last surviving British member of the Dambuster raid - an attack on Germany’s Ruhr Valley dams in 1943, which went on to become the stuff of Second World War folklore. Now aged 91, Johnny reflects on his role as flight sergeant during the dangerous RAF mission.

 

Photo courtesy of the Bradford Exchange, who awarded Johnny a replica Lancaster bomber to mark the 70th anniversary of the raid.

STUDIO PHOTO :: JANE PEYTON, TOM ROBINSON, SUZI, RICHARD AND SIMON HOOD

STUDIO PHOTO :: JANE PEYTON, TOM ROBINSON, SUZI, RICHARD AND SIMON HOOD

BLOG :: RICHARD ON HIS HOME FROM HOME, EDINBURGH.

I am in Edinburgh for the festival, not the fringe, which seems to belong to my past, but for the main festival which may tell you something about the processes of age, complacency and embourgoisement in a stoutish middle aged parson. In truth, the main festival is far more radical and exciting than nearly anything on the fringe, all those comics on the make signed up to the ha-ha versions of Simon Cowell, all those black footless tights, all those flyers. I’m here to interview some people at platform events, a psychiatrist who is interested in the interface between technology and spirituality and to talk to Philip Glass and Patti Smith who are here performing their tribute to Allen Ginsberg. What’s not to like?  

 

But even without these enticements, I love Edinburgh. One of my oldest friends lives here and I always lodge with him when I visit, so I don’t have to stay in a hotel with forty people I know from London, or, worst of all, in one of the flats the BBC rents for the duration from the many here who choose to go on holiday for a fortnight and hand their city over to the mimes. I once stayed in one with a loo so narrow you could not close the door properly if you were sitting on it. Staying with a friend not only means my daily needs are amply provided for, but I also get to hang out with his friends, and in the twenty five years I’ve been coming we’ve all got to know each other very well. I’ve been to their marriages, the baptisms of their children, been on group holidays, and buried one. It is really like a home from home, and every time the train heads north out of Berwick on Tweed for some reason I think of Van Morrison and the Chieftains’ version of ‘Shenandoah’. I would so love to spend more time in Scotland, in Edinburgh and in Glasgow which I love too and in Kintyre, where we go ever year, and to get to know the Hebrides better. There’s something about this country and its people that resonates very deeply with me, I hope not too sentimentally – I toured the world with a tough Glaswegian and have learned something of Scotland’s harder side. But that ultimately gives grain and depth to a place I have grown to love. I wonder if it will choose to go its own way in 2014? I suppose something will happen some time, but will it be that, then? I don’t know, and what does it matter what I think about something that’s for Scotland to decide? If it does become independent of the UK then I might one day become an emigrant, or an immigrant, depending on your perspective, and meet one night a year in a pub in Inverary to recite the poetry of Philip Larkin, bring in ceremoniously a chicken tikka masala, and put on Radio Four.

 

Should you put on Radio Four this Saturday at nine in the morning you will hear me and Suzy Klein in conversation with Tom Robinson, the last surviving British Dambuster Johnny Johnson, beer sommelier Jane Peyton and the inheritance tracks of Django Bates.

 

 

Credits

Role Contributor
PresenterRichard Coles
PresenterSuzy Klein
Interviewed GuestTom Robinson
Interviewed GuestSimon Hood
Interviewed GuestNina Wilson
Interviewed GuestJane Peyton
Interviewed GuestGeorge Johnson
Interviewed GuestDjango Bates
ProducerChris Wilson

Inheritance Tracks

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Boys cuddling in a field

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