Today, 10/05/2013 Live

10 May 2013 Last updated at 13:32

Friday 10 May

West Yorkshire police have published a review into their involvement with Jimmy Savile. New evidence suggests that children born at the beginning of the academic year are likely to achieve better results. And is wearable technology the next big thing?
  • 10 May 2013 14:27:37
    0900 Our editors this morning were Jat Gill and Lewis James. Thank you for all your comments and feedback today - particularly all your tweets for the dress! Coming up next on Radio 4, Sue MacGregor presents The Reunion - bringing together some of the key figures from the Hutton Inquiry.
    Before we go, here's Sarah's picture of John in the studio during the #tweetthedress item. She's put out a request for captions - if you have any suggestions let us know via Twitter. Good morning!
    0855 With another report on the future of transport infrastructure in the UK, this time from MPs on the transport committee on aviation, another extraordinarily complex round of arguments over capacity and passenger dynamics beckon. But what if you could rip it all up and start again? Adrian Mars, technology writer and futurologist, and Christian Wolmar, transport analyst, speculate about the possible future of transport in the UK.
    0850 Wearable technology - items of clothing which can perform many of the same functions as a computer or smart phone - is said to be the next big thing. Francesca Rosella, creative Director of Cute Circuit, and Alexander Fox, partner at Manches LLP, specialising in technology and intellectual property, discuss products such as such as Google's new glasses which allow the wearer to view the internet and take photos.
    LISTEN to the interview:
    Francesca Rosella has brought her "tweet dress" into the studio, which displays tweets which include the hashtag #tweetthedress
    BBC Radio 4 Today
    Here's Francesca with her 'tweet dress'. Use #tweetthedress to get your tweets live on her dress #r4today pic.twitter.com/tTyuHmsbsD
    Here's Emma from the office wearing the dress, lit up by tweets!
    Sarah Montague
    Emma from newsroom (only person with a 23"waist!) modelling #tweetthedress pic.twitter.com/UobnkCtd2z
    Thank you for all your tweets so far...
    John O'Shea
    Wearing your heart on your sleeve is one thing. Wearing my tweets on your dress is quite another. #tweetthedress @BBCr4today
    0834 A West Yorkshire Police report into its contact with Jimmy Savile has concluded there is "no evidence" he was protected from arrest or prosecution as a result of his relationship with the force. Mark Burns-Williamson, PCC in west Yorkshire, talks about the police's dealing with the information that they were given.
    It's quite apparent that things weren't joined up and mistakes were made. - Mark Burns-Williamson
    0825 It's emerged that complaints of sexual abuse made against a senior Church of England cleric were not referred to the police by the then Archbishop of York, David Hope. The former Dean of Manchester, Robert Waddington - who's now dead - is alleged to have abused two boys. Dr Hope has insisted he'd followed Church guidelines at the time.
    0820 Voters in Pakistan go to the polls on Saturday in a general election marred by violence throughout the campaigning. The BBC's world affairs correspondent Mike Wooldridge travelled to the city of Jhelum to see how the new uncertainties could influence the outcome.
    0817 Iain Duncan Smith has been told off for falsely claiming the coalition's controversial benefits cap had already caused ,000 people to move into jobs. Dame Anne Begg, Labour MP for Aberdeen South, explains that the UK Statistics Authority has written to the work and pensions secretary to tell him the claim was "unsupported by the official statistics".
    0810 A police force will publish a report today into its involvement with Jimmy Savile. The BBC's home affairs correspondent Danny Shaw explains what the report says and Ingrid Lee, temporary assistant chief constable, and Mark Burns-Williamson, PCC for west Yorkshire, discuss the findings of the report.
    0 00 This morning's Tweet of the Day came from the Nightingale. You can listen to the latest episode of this new BBC Radio 4 programme via iPlayer:
    BBC Radio 4 Today
    Coming up: W Yorks Police #Savile review (0810), wearable technology (0825) and the #Pakistan general election (0835) #r4today
    075 Summer-born children should have their exam marks boosted to compensate for being almost a year younger when they sit tests, a report has said. Lorraine Dearden,  director of the education Sector at the IFS, and Dame Sally Coates, Burlington Danes Academy head teacher, discuss whether pupils born in August are less likely to get good GCSEs or go to university than those born in September.
    During the interview, the possibility of a new grading system was discussed, which would see lower pass marks for younger children:
    "By re-grading and setting the boundary a bit lower, we are saying these younger children are on the right trajectory, they will catch up eventually." - Lorraine Dearden
    "I certainly wouldn't re-grade the exams, where would you have the cut-off? It would be an extremely complicated system."- Dame Sally Coates
    Cj
    Cj @Charleychoo21 tweeted:
    @BBCNews @BBCr4today I've always wanted my August born daughter to drop a year to enable her to "catch up" the system needs changing.
    Ian H
    Ian H @ha97lw tweeted:
    @BBCr4today of course the timings of exams matters. Early primary would not work. Grading by age adjustment should happen
    The likelihood of becoming a student at Oxford or Cambridge Universities can be strongly influenced by date of birth. Last year the chance of someone born in October becoming an Oxbridge undergraduate was more than 0% higher than for someone born in July. - Martin Rosenbaum, writing for the BBC News website:
    Rachael Orr
    My birthday is in August. Im bumping my Higher Maths B up to an A @BBCr4today
    Alex Canfor-Dumas
    Quite enjoying this @BBCr4today piece on academic disadvantages for summer birthday kids. Turns out I'm *even* cleverer than I thought!
    074 A new book is published today that tells story of the woman believed to be Britain's first and longest serving female spy in the Second World War - Krystyna Skarbek. Author of the book, Claire Mully, explains the true story.
    LISTEN to the interview:
    The Spectator have written a review of the book, which is entitled The spy Who Loved:
    For more information, visit Claire Mully's official website:
    07 5 The paper review.
    07 0 GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) is giving Save the Children $ m and entering into a five-year partnership with the charity to try to save the lives of m children. The BBC's international development correspondent, Naomi Grimley reports and Andrew Witty, GSK's chief executive, says whether the move is an entirely altruistic venture.
    LISTEN to the item:
    Coming up Jonathan Dimbleby has just been telling Sarah and John what's coming up on tonight's edition of Any Questions? on BBC Radio 4 at 0:00.
    07 5 Following its long-held policy on such matters, the Israeli government has neither confirmed nor denied bombing an arms convoy inside Syria last weekend - the third such attack this year. The BBC's Wyre Davies reports on increasing tensions in an already volatile region.
    Fran at AFI
    @BBCr4today Nice report from @wyredavies on reaction of Israelis affected by threats from Hezbollah & overspill of Syrian debacle. #r4today
    07 0 Business news with Tanya Beckett. BT has just announced its latest financial results - we speak to CEO Ian Livingston.
    NewsnightMouse
    I thought it was funny when the boss of #BT called @mrjakehumphrey Jake Humphrys. Maybe Ian Livingston thinks he's signed John! #R4Today
    If you missed the 06 5 summary, you can download the podcast here:
    Tanya is standing in for our usual Business presenter, Simon Jack, who is off this morning for his birthday.
    Henry Pryor
    Happy birthday & #ff @simonjacktoday, voice of Business on @BBCr4today.
    07 5 A police force has published a report into its involvement with Jimmy Savile. Alan Collins, of Pannone Solicitors, explains that West Yorkshire Police began a review in January of all past contact with Savile, who lived in Leeds, after a report by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) highlighted failings by forces across Britain.
    LISTEN to the interview:
    READ the report:
    0709 The government should expand Heathrow and forget about Boris Island, according to MPs on the Transport Committee, who release their report on aviation policy today. Louise Ellman, chair of the House of Commons' Transport Committee, and Boris Johnson, Mayor of London, discuss what should be done to increase the UK's airport capacity.
    LISTEN to the discussion:
    READ the Transport Select Committee's report:
    BBC Radio 4 Today
    The case for a third runway is compelling and it's best that that's done at Heathrow, says Transport Cttee chair @LouiseEllman #r4today
    "What the report is saying that's interesting is that the long term future is for not just a third runway but a fourth runway. That, it seems to me is a perfectly logical thing to do, we do need a 4 runway hub airport. The difficulty is, that would consign hundreds of thousands of Londoners to unacceptable degrees of noise pollution."- Boris Johnson
    politicshomeuk
    . @MayorofLondon on a British exit from the EU: "I don't think it would be anything like as cataclysmic as predicted." @BBCr4today
    0640 John and Sarah take a look at this morning's newspaper headlines.
    Good morning John and Sarah are presenting today, live on BBC Radio 4 until 0900. You can have  your say on this morning's programme by following us on Twitter or liking us on Facebook.
    BBC Radio 4 Today
    Coming up: Police review over #Savile (0810) @MayorofLondon on Airports (0709) & wearable tech: the dress that shows tweets (0822) #r4today
    You can also listen to the programme live online via the BBC's iPlayer Radio:
    055 This morning's Tweet of the Day came from the Nightingale. You can listen to the latest episode of this new BBC Radio 4 programme via iPlayer:
    Today's running order Subject to change 06 5 Business news with Tanya Beckett on news that the announcement yesterday that BT will offer free Premier League football coverage to its broadband customers is one of the strongest challenges yet to Sky's 0 year dominance of the game.   0709 The government should expand Heathrow and forget about Boris Island, according to MPs on the Transport Committee, who release their report on aviation policy today. Louise Ellman, chair of the House of Commons' Transport Committee, and Boris Johnson, Mayor of London, discuss what should be done to increase the UK's airport capacity.   07 5 A police force will publish a report today into its involvement with Jimmy Savile. Alan Collins, of Pannone Solicitors, explains that West Yorkshire Police began a review in January of all past contact with Savile, who lived in Leeds, after a report by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) highlighted failings by forces across Britain.   07 Business news with Tanya Beckett.   07 Following its long-held policy on such matters, the Israeli government has neither confirmed nor denied bombing an arms convoy inside Syria last weekend - the third such attack this year. The BBC's Wyre Davies reports on increasing tensions in an already volatile region.   07 0 GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) is giving Save the Children $ m and entering into a five-year partnership with the charity to try to save the lives of m children. The BBC's international development correspondent, Naomi Grimley reports and Andrew Witty, GSK's chief executive, says whether the move is an entirely altruistic venture.   07 5 The paper review.   074 A new book is published today that tells story of the woman believed to be Britain's first and longest serving female spy in the Second World War. Author of the book, Claire Mully, explains the true story.   0747 Thought for the Day with Akhandadhi Das, a Vaishnav Hindu teacher and theologian.   075 Summer-born children should have their exam marks boosted to compensate for being almost a year younger when they sit tests, a report has said. Lorraine Dearden,  director of the education Sector at the IFS, and Dame Sally Coates, Burlington Danes Academy head teacher, discuss whether pupils born in August are less likely to get good GCSEs or go to university than those born in September.   0 0 A police force will publish a report today into its involvement with Jimmy Savile. The BBC's home affairs correspondent Danny Shaw explains what the report says and Ingrid Lee, temporary assistant chief constable, and Mark Burns-Williamson, PCC for west Yorkshire, discuss the findings of the report.   0 7 Iain Duncan Smith has been told off for falsely claiming the coalition's controversial benefits cap had already caused ,000 people to move into jobs. Dame Anne Begg, Labour MP for Aberdeen South, explains that the UK Statistics Authority has written to the work and pensions secretary to tell him the claim was "unsupported by the official statistics".   0 Wearable technology - items of clothing which can perform many of the same functions as a computer or smart phone - is said to be the next big thing. Francesca Rosella, creative Director of Cute Circuit, and Alexander Fox, partner at Manches LLP, specialising in technology and intellectual property, discuss products such as such as Google's new glasses which allow the wearer to view the internet and take photos.   0 A West Yorkshire Police report into its contact with Jimmy Savile has concluded there is "no evidence" he was protected from arrest or prosecution as a result of his relationship with the force. Mark Burns-Williamson, PCC in west Yorkshire, talks about the police's dealing with the information that they were given.   0 Business news with Tanya Beckett.   0 4 Voters in Pakistan go to the polls on Saturday in a general election marred by violence throughout the campaigning. The BBC's world affairs correspondent Mike Wooldridge travelled to the city of Jhelum to see how the new uncertainties could influence the outcome.   0 47 The financial crisis has prompted many young people to emigrate from Ireland over the past few years. The BBC's Andrew Martin explains that the National Youth Council of Ireland has released what they say is the first qualitative study of the effect of emigration on Ireland's youth over the past two years.   0 5 With another report on the future of transport infrastructure in the UK, this time from MPs on the transport committee on aviation, another extraordinarily complex round of arguments over capacity and passenger dynamics beckon. But what if you could rip it all up and start again? Adrian Mars, technology writer and futurologist, and Christian Wolmar, transport analyst, speculate about the possible future of transport.

Saving lives at sea

Saving small children at sea – MSF migrant rescue diary

The diary of MSF doctor Erna Rijnierse aboard a rescue ship in the Mediterranean.