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07/05/2013

Duration:
28 minutes
First broadcast:
Tuesday 07 May 2013

Helen Castor is joined in the Making History studio by Professor Pauline Croft from the University of London and archaeologist Dr Matt Pope from University College London.

Tom Holland travels to Enniskillen in Northern Ireland where a road built for the G8 meeting in June sliced the top off a wetland landscape feature known as a crannog. Tom meets with Dr John O'Keeffe and Dr Nora Bermingham who explain how this man-made timber construction was inhabited for over one thousand years from the 7th Century onwards and that the artefacts discovered are changing the way we see Ireland in the early medieval ages.

Back in the studio, Dr Rowena Archer from Christ Church Oxford explains the political significance of a 15th Century child-bride Anne Mowbray who was married to one of the Princes in the Tower and who was at the centre of Edward VI's land-grab. Her remains were discovered by builders working on a bomb site in East London in 1964 at a time when rescue archaeology was unheard of.

Finally, in Edinburgh, Fiona Watson meets up with Dr Alan MacDonald from the University of Dundee who explains the impact on the Scottish Parliament of James 1st's move south to London to become James VI in 1603.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

  • Programme Guests

    Helen Castor is joined in the Making History studio by Professor Pauline Croft from the University of London author of "King James (British History in Perspective)" and archaeologist Dr Matt Pope from University College London.
  • Enniskillen Crannog

    Tom Holland travels to Enniskillen in Northern Ireland where a road planned for next month's G8 conference sliced through the top of a wetland man-made landscape feature known as a crannog.

     

    Tom hears from Dr John O'Keeffe of the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and excavation director Dr Nora Bermingham that the artefacts from this site are changing our understanding of Ireland in the 7th Century.

     

    The Impartial Reporter

    The History Blog

    BBC Northern Ireland

  • Duchess in a building site

    In 1964, before rescue archaeology, builders working on a bomb site in London's East End came across the lead coffin of a 15th Century child-bride Anne Mowbray.

     

    Dr Rowena Archer from Christ Church Oxford explains that Anne was central to the politics of the court of Edward VI.

     

    British Archaeology

  • One Crown – Two Parliaments

    Fiona Watson in Edinburgh meets with Dr Alan MacDonald from the University of Dundee to discover what the impact of James 1st's move south to become James VI of England had on the Scottish Parliament.

     

    Records of the Parliament of Scotland (University of St Andrews)

     

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