30/04/2013

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Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by Dr Alison Carrol, Lecturer in European History at Brunel University, and the author of "Berlin at War" Roger Moorhouse.

Professor Matthew Cobb joins the discussion to talk about whether or not the Liberation of Paris in 1944 has become forgotten - or at least misunderstood.

Helen Castor meets up with Dr Jonathan Conlin from the University of Southampton, who has written a new Tale of Two Cities - one which highlights the many shared histories of London and Paris.

Finally the author of "Fire and Steam", railway writer Christian Wolmar, heads for Balcombe in Sussex where the great grandfather of Making History listener John Ireland worked on the London to Brighton Railway shortly after its opening in 1841. He finds out that the HS2 of its day was fought over by local landowners who saw the benefits and not the environmental damage of the railway.

Contact the programme: making.history@bbc.co.uk

Produced by Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

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28 minutes

Last on

Tue 30 Apr 2013 15:00

Programme Guests

Tom Holland is joined in the Making History studio by Dr Alison Carrol, Lecturer in European History at Brunel University, and the author of "Berlin at War" Roger Moorhouse.

 

Professor Matthew Cobb joins the discussion to talk about whether or not the Liberation of Paris in 1944 has become forgotten – or at least misunderstood.

 

Matthew's new book is called "Eleven Days in August" and is published by Simon & Schuster

Paris and London

Helen Castor meets up with Dr Jonathan Conlin from the University of Southampton who has written a new book "Tales of Two Cities: Paris, London and the birth of the modern city". In it he picks up on the shared, not the conflicting histories that we might expect.

London to Brighton Railway in 1841

Finally, the author of "Fire and Steam", railway writer Christian Wolmar, heads for Balcombe in Sussex where the great grandfather of Making History listener John Ireland worked on the London to Brighton Railway shortly after its opening in 1841. Christian finds out that the HS2 of its day was fought over by local landowners who saw the benefits and not the environmental damage of the railway.

 

John Ireland has written a book about his great grandfather which is called "Hoops and Signals"