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15/02/2013

Duration:
3 hours
First broadcast:
Friday 15 February 2013

Morning news and current affairs with James Naughtie and John Humphrys, including:

0810
A man who is dying from motor neurone disease is campaigning to get the law on new drugs changed so people in his position would be allowed to take new drugs that might help them even if the drugs have not passed through trials that the law demands. Professor Sir Peter Lachmann ,former president of the Academy of Medical Sciences, and Sir Michael Rawlins, president of the Royal Society of Medicine and head of Nice, debate whether patients should be allowed access to new drugs.

0821
Dr Stuart Semple, reader in evolutionary anthropology at Roehampton University in London, and lawyer and businesswoman Margaret Mountford, discuss Dr Semple's research that suggests that fidgeting can be a sign of relaxation and stress.

0841
Manchester University has discovered the original copy of a proclamation calling for the arrest of Machiavelli in the depths of Florence's archives. Professor Stephen Milner, Serena professor of Italian at Manchester University, describes the findings.

  • Friday's live page

    A rundown of stories from Friday 15 February including programme highlights and comment.

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    Insight, analysis and expert debate as key policy makers are challenged on the latest news stories.

Friday 15 February

A campaigner is trying to get the law changed so terminally ill people can offer to test drugs that could help them, but which haven't yet been approved for use. Oscar Pistorius is due in court to face charges of the murder of his girlfriend. And the truth about fidgeting.

  • 15 Feb 2013 08:52:34

    0855

    Legal philosopher Ronald Dworkin, the man behind some of the most influential theories of law and morality in modern jurisprudence, died on Thursday at the age of 81.  Michael Sandel, professor of government at Harvard University, and Les Green, professor of the philosophy of law at Oxford University, reflect on Mr Dworkin's life and legacy.

  • 15 Feb 2013 08:48:21

    0848

    The Intelligence and Security Committee, under Sir Malcolm Rifkind, may soon send its report to the Prime Minister detailing the results of its investigation into the long-standing collaboration between Huawei, the Chinese telecoms firm, and BT. Gordon Correra, the BBC’s security correspondent, explains why some people are concerned.

  • 15 Feb 2013 08:43:23

    0846

    A former Tesco worker has claimed that armbands designed to improve efficiency of warehouse staff are being used to conduct surveillance on them - a claim which Tesco denies. Mike Bourne, professor of business performance at Cranfield School of Management, says whether such devices can help productivity in the workplace.
  • 15 Feb 2013 08:36:18

    0842

    Manchester University has discovered the original copy of a proclamation calling for the arrest of Machiavelli in the depths of Florence's archives. Professor Stephen Milner, Serena professor of Italian at Manchester University, describes the findings.

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