The Fire Fighters Charity

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Duration: 10 minutes

Presenter Matt Allwright makes an appeal on behalf of The Fire Fighters Charity, a charity who provide vital support for the fire and rescue community and their families.

The film features fire fighter Debbie Young, who suffered a career-threatening injury whilst responding to a fire at a cafe. After months of treatment, Debbie was still no nearer to returning to full operational duties; she feared she would have to give up the job she loved. Fortunately Debbie was able to attend one of the charity's rehabilitation centres, where she received specialist treatment for her injury, and last year she returned to work fully recovered.

  • Donate online now

    Donate online now

    Please donate by going to the website www.firefighterscharity.org.uk/ or by calling 01256 366 566. If you’d like to post a donation please make your cheque payable to ‘The Fire Fighters Charity' and send it to 'The Fire Fighters Charity, Level 6, Belvedere, Basing View, Basingstoke, RG21 4HG'.

    The Fire Fighters Charity
  • Matt Allwright

    Matt Allwright

    The role of a fire fighter is one of bravery, loyalty, and devotion to public service.

    They don’t just spend their time fighting fires but also respond to a whole range of other life-saving emergencies such as road traffic collisions, flooding incidents and rescuing people from height, as well as delivering home safety visits. I think they do a fantastic job of keeping us safe.

    The Fire Fighters Charity is important as it provides fire fighters with the help they need to recover from injury, surgery or illness, so they can return to serving and protecting their local communities as quickly as possible.

  • The Fire Fighters Charity

    The Fire Fighters Charity

    Every year, thousands of fire fighters are injured whilst protecting the public and every 30 seconds in the UK, fire fighters are called to an incident, putting their lives on the line and often sustaining physical injuries and emotional trauma whilst carrying out their duties.

    The Fire Fighters Charity is the UK’s leading provider of services that enhance quality of life for serving and retired fire service personnel and their families. We aim to make a positive difference by supporting people in the fire and rescue community when they are in need.

    We provide fire fighters with the help they need to recover from injury, surgery or illness, so they can return back to serving and protecting their local communities as quickly as possible.

    But sometimes the scars of fire fighting aren’t just physical and the deepest scars are often those you cannot see. The funds raised by our Lifeline appeal will enable us to provide even higher quality services to more people in the fire and rescue community and to provide a greater spread of services including, for the first time, emotional wellbeing support and mental health services.

    The role of a fire fighter is one of bravery, loyalty and devotion to public service. We hope you never need the help of the brave men and women in the UK’s fire and rescue service. But you can help us to be there when they need our help.

  • Debbie

    Debbie

    Debbie Young always wanted to be fire-fighter and joined the fire service when she was 19 years old. In July 2010, she was fighting a fire at a café when a television fell off the wall on top of her, and seriously injured her arm and shoulder. She was unable to return to work as a fully operational fire fighter. Debbie said, “The doctors were saying that it would get better and it obviously wasn’t getting better. I just didn’t know what to do, where to go or who could help me. All I could see was I wasn’t going to be a fire fighter again.”

    Fortunately, the Charity assessed Debbie, identifying the cause of her pain and told her she would need surgery. After an operation she visited one of the charity’s rehabilitation centres for further treatment. Last year she returned to her watch and resumed full operational duties. She said, “I wanted to be out there, I wanted to be helping people again and it was The Fire Fighters Charity that made me do that.”

  • Steve

    Steve

    In 1995, fire fighter Steve Jeffery was involved in a traffic collision whist responding to an incident. He was trapped in his vehicle, and suffered multiple broken bones. After almost a year off, Steve returned to work. Sadly this was not the end of his ordeal. 16 years later, whist watching a news report about a fire crew, his accident came back to haunt him. Steve said, “I remember very vividly waking up with images of the crash I had been involved in. That image continued to reoccur, always the same image, me trapped in a fire engine.” Steve then began to have mood swings and became very short tempered, which affected his family and work colleagues. Unknown to Steve, he was suffering from Delayed Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Steve went to see one of the Charity’s psychotherapists who identified his condition and helped him to deal with with his emotions. He said, “it’s a long road to recovery but I think I’m in a position with the help of the charity, my own service, family, colleagues, where I can cope.“

  • Behind the Scenes

  • Matt filming at the fire station

    Matt filming at the fire station

  • Matt and the fire fighters

    Matt and the fire fighters

  • Filming Matt and the fire crew

    Filming Matt and the fire crew

  • The crew and Matt about to roll

    The crew and Matt about to roll

Credits

Presenter
Matt Allwright
Producer
Gavin Ahern
Executive Producer
Gill Tierney

Broadcasts

Amounts raised

Money

Lifeline has helped raise money for hundreds of charities across the UK and abroad.

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