23/09/2012

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Duration: 1 hour

The team are in Lochaber in the west of the Scottish Highlands. Matt Baker goes on a steam train ride, described as the greatest railway journey in the world. Julia Bradbury finds out more about the female Victorian mountaineering pioneers who changed the face of climbing for women for ever.

Tom Heap investigates how we get our children to rediscover the great outdoors. Jules Hudson takes to a kayak to discover the wildlife that thrives on the west coast of Scotland and Adam Henson is back in Switzerland, having herded more than a thousand black nosed sheep down from the Alps, he's now taking part in the festival which celebrates their safe arrival in the local village.

Last on

Wed 3 Oct 2012 00:45 BBC One Northern Ireland only

See all previous episodes from Countryfile

  • Ladies’ Climbing

    Ladies’ Climbing

    Julia Bradbury is in Glencoe discovering the challenges faced by women climbers a century ago. She meets two members of the oldest women’s climbing club in Scotland – the Scottish Ladies Climbing Club - including Rhona Weir, who at 92 years old is still active in the hills. Then, led by climbing archivist Alison Higham, Julia takes on the challenge of scrambling in a skirt and hat, as ladies would have done in the early 1900s. But she quickly discovers that skirts and climbing are not an ideal partnership.

    Find out about Scottish ladies’ climbing
  • Matt On The West Highland Line

    Matt On The West Highland Line

    Matt Baker boards the West Highland steam train at Fort William and travels in Victorian style to Banavie and then Glenfinnan. On the way he passes over the towering Glenfinnan viaduct, which was made famous by the Harry Potter films. At Banavie he visits an eight-gated lock, the “Neptune’s Staircase”. This is a vital part of the Caledonian Canal, a continuous waterway of canals and sea lochs connecting Fort William to Inverness. At Glenfinnan, Matt climbs an ancient Lochaber pine to harvest pine cones.

    Learn more about the Caledonian Canal
  • Adam And The Alps Part Two

    Adam And The Alps Part Two

    This week Adam continues his journey in Switzerland. Every year more than 1000 sheep are brought down off the Swiss Alps in Valais. As Adam’s been discovering, they cross some treacherous terrain and finally reach the homecoming festival that is celebrated by lots of spectators. The flock spends the night in an old stone enclosure and the following day the farmers sort through and claim the sheep that belong to them. The black-nosed ewes are unique to this area and have a thick long fleece that has allowed them to survive the harsh mountain conditions. Adam manages to get up close with the back-nosed sheep which are unique to this area.

  • Jules Seeks Out 'Scottish Coral'

    Jules Seeks Out 'Scottish Coral'

    Jules Hudson heads to the Sound of Arisaig to discover one of the Scottish west coast’s best-kept secrets. Maerl is a red coral-like seaweed which thrives on the sea bed of the shallow coastlines and lochs of the Western Highlands. It plays a vital role in nurturing young fish and scallops. Jules explores this protected maerl habitat by sea kayak. Then he meets marine biologist, Jane Dodd, as she surveys the Sound of Arisaig using an underwater camera. Jules also finds out why maerl plays a part in creating west Scotland’s iconic white sandy beaches.

    Discover more about maerl
  • Kids And The Countryside

    Kids And The Countryside

    The National Trust is running a campaign to re-connect children with nature, but how easy is that going to be? To find out, Tom Heap heads to Plymouth to meet the Carrington family. They’re too worried to let their children go and play in the woods on their own, but Tom finds some other safe and supervised ways that can enjoy the great outdoors, whether that’s on the land or in the sea. But will they like them?

    IMAGE: Courtesy of the Carrington family

    Find out more about the National Trust’s campaign
  • Crofters And Bothies

    Crofters And Bothies

    While walking near the Duror Forest, Julia takes shelter from a storm in a traditional bothy, which provides simple overnight accommodation for walkers. She learns bothy etiquette from the Mountain Bothies Association’s John Arnott as well as some of the history of the buildings they renovate for use by hill walkers. Many bothies used to be crofters’ dwellings, but were abandoned over the years as shepherds deserted the hills. Julia discovers that the tradition of crofting, or small scale farming, is one that many in Lochaber are keen to preserve. She meets Ian McTaggart and his apprentice Seymour McLeod, as they herd their cows on the common grazing of Glencoe village.

    Find out how to become a crofter

Credits

Presenter
Matt Baker
Presenter
Matt Baker
Presenter
Julia Bradbury
Presenter
Julia Bradbury
Presenter
Tom Heap
Presenter
Tom Heap
Series Producer
Teresa Bogan
Series Producer
Teresa Bogan
Presenter
Adam Henson
Presenter
Adam Henson

Broadcasts

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