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Metropolis

Episode 3 of 3

Duration:
30 minutes
First broadcast:
Tuesday 07 August 2012

Cultural commentator Paul Morley explores a history of popular music through some of the iconic recording studios in which classic albums were created.

Without them music as we know it would simply not exist. At its most basic, there'd be no technology to capture the sounds envisaged by the musicians and created and enhanced by the engineers and producers... and there'd be no music for the record companies to market and distribute. But more than that, the studios actually played a crucial part in the structure and fabric of the music recorded there - the sounds enhanced by the studio space itself... the potential and shortcomings of the equipment and technology housed in the cubicles... and the ability and 'vision' of the engineers and producers operating it all to find the new sound that makes the recordings sound different and fresh.

In the final programme of the series Paul Morley ventures to West London and one of the last major studio complexes to be built in the heyday of the music industry. But without an exalted musical history to fall back on and decades of experience to help run it, how do you go about creating a world-class facility frequented by the likes of Amy Winehouse, Mick Jagger and Rihanna... and how do you keep it going when all around you are closing their doors?

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

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