02/05/2012

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Duration: 30 minutes

With more and more consumers in Kent and Sussex made to use water meters, Natalie Graham asks why is one of our local water companies allowing millions of gallons to leak every day? From the wettest part of England to the driest, meteorologist Nick Miller debunks a few myths about our perception of 'rainy old Blighty' and David Whiteley finds out if the government's water strategy measures up against our European counterparts.

  • Feature: Drought: Dry winter could mean standpipes next year

    Feature: Drought: Dry winter could mean standpipes next year

    As much of England remains in drought the possibility of standpipes in the street will become "more likely" if there is another dry winter.

    Environment Secretary Caroline Spelman told BBC Inside Out that the UK will have to look at other ways to supply water if shortages continue.

    Despite the recent wet weather groundwater levels remain low.

    Read a feature from the BBC News website below...

    BBC News: Drought: Dry winter could mean standpipes next year
  • Video: Caroline Spelman defends government plans for drought

    Video: Caroline Spelman defends government plans for drought

    Despite the arrival of wet weather in April, experts are still warning England faces a crisis in its water supply.

    They believe major problems could unfold if the country experiences a 'third dry winter'.

    Adrian McDonald, professor of environmental management at University of Leeds, gives his views on what might happen if England continues to experience drought.

    He told BBC Inside Out that he is unaware of a coherent strategic national plan to deal with three dry winters in a row.

    However, Secretary of State for Environment, Caroline Spelman, defended the government and said it does have a contingency plan.

    Watch a video feature below...

    BBC News: Caroline Spelman defends government plans for drought
  • Video: Drought fears continue in England despite recent rain

    Video: Drought fears continue in England despite recent rain

    With the threat of another dry winter devastating England's water supplies, Inside Out investigates the looming water crisis. Meteorologist Nick Miller looks at the wettest and driest parts of Britain as drought fears continue across England despite heavy rain in April 2012. He also explains how the drought came about.

    Watch a video feature from BBC Inside Out below...

    BBC News: Drought fears continue in England despite recent rain
  • Feature: Southern Water in pledge on leak detection

    Feature: Southern Water in pledge on leak detection

    Southern Water has pledged to meet its leakage targets after two of the driest winters on record in the South East.

    Last year the water company, which supplies Sussex, Kent, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, wasted an average of 96 million litres a day through leaks.

    It was told by water regulator Ofwat to return £5m to its customers for failing to deliver leakage reduction targets.

    Director of communications Geoff Loader said there would always be leaks but it was working hard to find and fix them.

    Read the full feature on the BBC News website below...

    BBC News: Southern Water in pledge on leak detection
  • Who, What, Why: How much rain is needed to ease the drought?

    Who, What, Why: How much rain is needed to ease the drought?

    It has been the wettest April in the UK since records began in 1910, with flood alerts and warnings in place across England and Wales. Why then are parts of the country still officially in drought and why is the hosepipe ban set to remain?

    People have long spoken of April showers, but the likes of last month's heavy rain and storms haven't been seen in more than 100 years. The heavens opened just as hosepipe bans were introduced and a number of regions were officially declared to be in drought.

    While the long, persistent rainfall has provided relief for farmers, gardeners and wildlife in drought areas, experts say it will take more than one wet month to make up for many dry ones.

    Read the full feature on the BBC News website below...

    BBC News: Who, What, Why: How much rain is needed to ease the drought?
  • Infographic: Rainfall and water supplies

    Infographic: Rainfall and water supplies

    Source: BBC News website

Credits

Presenter
Natalie Graham
Reporter
Nick Miller
Reporter
David Whiteley

Broadcasts

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