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Last on

Fri 11 May 2012 11:00 BBC Radio 4

Duration:
28 minutes
First broadcast:
Friday 11 May 2012

In every school class, at least one teenager will need urgent treatment for clinical depression. With thousands of under-16s on anti-depressants, there is concern that mental health problems amongst youngsters are on the rise. So what is the difference between typical teen behaviour and something more serious?

Presenter Miranda Sawyer hears from young people who speak frankly about their thoughts and feelings, often hidden from those around them. She talks to parents, teachers and experts to find out what are the first signs that a teenager is suffering from clinical depression - and asks why it is sometimes so difficult to spot those early symptoms.

In this programme, teenagers speak about the increasing pressures of growing up today - from school, home and friends - and Miranda asks why do some teenagers cope with these pressures whilst others spiral down into depression? How much are social networking and today's economic climate to blame and how much of the illness is hereditary?

At school, some teachers may dismiss early signs of depression as bad behaviour or lack of attention in class, but increasingly secondary schools like Bradley Stokes near Bristol have a specialist unit and strategies in place to identify vulnerable pupils and refer them early for psychological help.

Often social stigma and guilt make it difficult for teenagers and parents to come forward and GPs may initially put problems down to adolescence, while child and adolescent mental health services (CAHMS) can be patchy and oversubscribed. Miranda investigates the treatment available and finds out how charities like Young Minds support both teenagers with mental health problems and worried parents.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.

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