Episode 8

Image for Episode 8Not currently available on BBC iPlayer

Episode 8 of 17

Duration: 40 minutes

In this episode: the house party to end all house parties in Project X; Jennifer Aniston and Paul Rudd drop out of the rat race in comedy Wanderlust; and Tom Hardy and Chris Pine fight for the love of Reese Witherspoon in This Means War.

Last on

Mon 5 Mar 2012 01:45 BBC One except Scotland

See all previous episodes from Film 2012

  • REVIEW OF THIS MEANS WAR

    REVIEW OF THIS MEANS WAR

    DANNY: This film is a fiendish Hollywood experiment to fuse the action film with the rom-com to create the perfect date movie. But the action elements don’t work at all, they’re sloppy and flaccid. The romance is strange because there’s obviously a love triangle at the centre of this movie but the director, McG is only really interested in the bromance between Chris Pine and Tom Hardy which is really overheated.

    CLAUDIA: It’s not great but I quite like the fact that it’s a nonsense. Reese Witherspoon’s character is a nonsense, her house is a nonsense, these boys in the CIA who do nothing but sit at desks all day are an absolute nonsense. I tell you who saves it for me; Chelsea Handler. She’s only in it for a couple of moments but they are laugh out loud. She talks about Chris Pines’ miniature hands – once you’ve seen them, trust me you won’t be able to get them out of your head! It’s all out ridiculous, nothing makes sense.

    DANNY: I’m not going to argue with the fact that it’s ridiculous –and there’s a place for ridiculous in the world. I just think Tom Hardy is better than this – everyone associated with this movie is better than this. Seeing McG do this it’s like watching a gibbon make a soufflé.

  • REVIEW OF WANDERLUST

    REVIEW OF WANDERLUST

    DANNY: There’s a lot about this movie which is very funny – especially the first 10 minutes which are a real pleasure. You have this frantic New York couple whose lives are unravelling and it has the pace and rhythm of a real screwball comedy. After that their lives take a different tack and the film takes a different tack. The comedy is often a bit creaky and repetitive but there’s some funny stuff in there. It’s likeable – there’s almost a Neil Simon tinge to it. I sense you disagree with me.

    CLAUDIA: It’s just not funny enough and I found it ever so painful. If I’m honest I have a problem with Jennifer Anniston – she always plays the same character with the same mannerisms. Paul Rudd is great but the stereotypes in this commune come thick and fast. It’s sad because you expect it to be funnier and it just isn’t funny.

  • REVIEW OF PROJECT X

    REVIEW OF PROJECT X

    CLAUDIA: I have to say this film was absolutely not made with me in mind. I’m a little old lady and I was absolutely on the side of the poor neighbour who was tasered. I watched the whole thing very anxiously – I thought, they’re creating a mess, there’s no insurance company who will cover this. It’s not for me, the characters are repellent. I could talk for an hour about the depiction of women in this film which made me want to punch something. But the point is that if I was 17 and I sneaked into this film with 4 friends, I imagine I’d think I’d died and gone to heaven.

    DANNY: This is the child-catchers of Hollywood throwing the young cinema audience a party to try and stop them getting away. It’s not a realistic party, it starts with a stoned Yorkshire Terrier on a bouncy castle and then 2000 people and a garden gnome full of ecstasy later the riot squad arrive. And that really is it as a movie. There’s no character or plot – maybe the filmmakers think 16 and 17 year olds don’t care about that kind of thing. What’s interesting is that this film has an 18 certificate which means that if you’re legal to see this film, you’re also too old to see it.

  • REVIEW OF CARANCHO - Claudia and Danny's film of the week

    REVIEW OF CARANCHO - Claudia and Danny's film of the week

    CLAUDIA: In an odd week, finally we get to a film that is absolutely worth the ticket price. It’s about ambulance chasers in Buenos Aires. It doesn’t sound exciting but it really is – it’s a warped love story and the end has the best climax.

    DANNY: This is a tough little film about real issues – it’s a great punchy little noir with great performances particularly from Ricardo Darin who you may remember from Nine Queens, he’s got this great haunted presence, he’s so perfect for this role. It’s a very well made film.

  • LIKE THAT? TRY THIS....

    CLAUDIA AND DANNY'S RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CARANCHO FANS.

    The Conversation (1974)
    Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation remains as gripping today as when it was first released. Gene Hackman gives an amazing performance as a surveillance expert who suspects that a couple he is spying on will be murdered. This is a rich thriller that preys on your mind and one that remains timely in our modern day world of constant surveillance. It’s definitely worth a re-watch to savour the direction, editing and Hackman’s central performance.


    Lion’s Den (2008)
    This uplifting social drama comes from the same director as Carancho and focuses on a young woman Julia and her son, Tomas, who is born inside an Argentinean prison. A woman raising her child in a prison cell may seem like a hard sell, but in Lion’s Den Trapero paints an extraordinary picture of human resolve. Martina Gusman (who is also in Carancho & married to Trapero) gives an extraordinarily compassionate performance as Julia and makes this small film an unmissable gem.


    The Secret In Their Eyes (2009)
    The Secret In Their Eyes or El secreto de sus ojos won the 2010 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film and was indeed a deserved winner….In Juan José Campanella’s Argentinian film a retired legal counsellor is haunted by a brutal murder case from his past. This is a remarkable thriller and will keep you mesmerised as the protagonist slowly uncovers and reveals secrets from the past. It’s probably best to describe this film as spellbinding and one that cries out to be watched if you overlooked it the first time around. Campanella should give lessons in how to make intelligent movies.

Credits

Presenter
Claudia Winkleman
Presenter
Claudia Winkleman
Presenter
Danny Leigh
Presenter
Danny Leigh
Series Producer
Jayne Stanger
Series Producer
Jayne Stanger
Executive Producer
Basil Comely
Executive Producer
Basil Comely

Broadcasts

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