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Jagger in Jail

Episode 1 of 5

Duration:
30 minutes
First broadcast:
Tuesday 21 February 2012

The History Plays
By Nigel Smith
Jagger in Jail

The History Plays are a series of two-hander plays by Vent author Nigel Smith which are imagined conversations at key moments in recent history, moments that have permanently changed the British psyche. Starting with Mick Jagger's conviction for drug possession and the surprising pro-Jagger line taken in a Times editorial; through the fragmented morality of John Stonehouse; the Indian summer of patriotism over the Falklands; the death of Diana; and the end of the Blair years, The History Plays are a satirical and thoughtful exploration of huge social forces played out in small human dramas. This is a series about the promises and pitfalls of history, the points of conflict. But what's really significant is what these moments say about our attitudes and assumptions now.

JAGGER IN JAIL
Written and directed by Nigel Smith
Produced by Gareth Edwards

Starring Kayvan Novak ("Facejacker") as Mick Jagger and Blake Harrison ("The Inbetweeners") as Jim

It is 1967, the summer of love and Mick Jagger, lead singer of the Rolling Stones, is in prison starting his three-month sentence for drug possession. His trial - and particularly his sentence - has both scandalised and split public opinion.

Jagger in Jail imagines the conversation that might have taken place between Mick and a cellmate, Jim, during what turned out to be his only night behind bars. As the night passes Jim and Mick find that while they have a fair bit in common, society's plans for them could not be more different. And Jim isn't too happy about it..

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