Episode 4

Image for Episode 4Not currently available on BBC iPlayer

Episode 4 of 17

Duration: 40 minutes

Jodie Foster and Kate Winslet face-off in Carnage; things are out of this world in Chronicle; Charlize Theron needs to grow up in Young Adult; and Elizabeth Olsen stars in psychological thriller Martha Marcy May Marlene.

  • REVIEW OF CARNAGE

    REVIEW OF CARNAGE

    DANNY: It’s a pint glass of vinegar. It’s incredibly, brutally funny with scalpel sharp dialogue. My reservation about it is that the original play had ambitions to be about something grand, to say something daring and controversial about human nature but I don’t think the film really does do that so instead it’s just a lot of people saying expertly unpleasant things to each other which is funny to watch but after a while you begin to feel bad about laughing. It’s like the middle class equivalent of a fight in a pub car park.

    CLAUDIA: They’re ghastly and it takes umbrella parenting to the next level. I saw the theatre production, it was much more claustrophobic on the stage. I loved this, although it did feel a bit contrived but it’s a masterclass in performances, it’s beautiful to watch – they’re all so good.

    DANNY: It’s a good night out at the theatre, at the cinema and I don’t have a problem with that.

  • REVIEW OF YOUNG ADULT

    REVIEW OF YOUNG ADULT

    CLAUDIA: Charlize Theron is so brilliant in this – this film is fabulous. It’s smarter and darker than Juno, which Diablo Cody also wrote. Charlize gives you a little peak into how tragic and how unwell and unhinged her character really is – she doesn’t behave like any other woman you’ll see at the cinema. The supporting cast are fantastic and my favourite thing about it is the end – it is the most un-Hollywood type ending to a film you’ll see.

    DANNY: It’s very different from Juno and pretty much anything else you’ll ever see at the cinema. It reminded me of the late great sitcom Seinfeld which had the motto ‘no hugging, no learning’ and in the middle of it you’ve got this creation, Mavis – she is a piece of work and this is a piece of work as well.

    CLAUDIA: I cannot recommend it highly enough.

  • REVIEW OF MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE - Claudia and Danny's Film of the Week

    REVIEW OF MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE - Claudia and Danny's Film of the Week

    DANNY: Every year there are a few movies that come out which remind me why I fell in love with cinema in the first place and this film is definitely one of them. It’s absolutely spellbinding. This is a psychological thriller about the difference between what’s real and what isn’t and how you often lose track of that. It’s expert at keeping you off balance and on-edge. I really don’t have a bad word to say about this film.

    CLAUDIA: I agree. If I was boring about Charlize Theron and about how Young Adult has been overlooked by the Oscars then this is an absolute crime. It’s sinister – nobody is how you think they’re going to be and nothing is explicit, nothing is shown, you can only imagine what happened to her but piecing it all together is fantastic. Elizabeth Olsen is phenomenal, she is mesmerising and beautiful. You will not get this film out of your head. Whatever you do please, please go and see this film.

  • REVIEW OF CHRONICLE

    REVIEW OF CHRONICLE

    CLAUDIA: It’s sweet, it has a geekiness, it has some great scenes and I really enjoyed it. However, it felt like they took the whole found footage device too far. I know I’m of the wrong generation though – 15 year old boys will love this.

    DANNY: They will. I thought this film was a really pleasant surprise. Visually it works brilliantly, I’m happy with the film. What’s so impressive is the way it changes tone. It’s very realistic about teenagers growing up in America, then as they explore their powers it becomes sci-fi, then it gets a lot darker and that’s where the film really excels. I’m very keen on this film.

  • LIKE THAT? TRY THIS....

    CLAUDIA AND DANNY'S RECOMMENDATIONS OF FILMS YOU MIGHT ENJOY IF YOU LOVED MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE.

    Winter's Bone (2010)
    20 year old Jennifer Lawrence earned a truckload of critical acclaim and an Oscar nomination for her unflinching performance as Ree, a young girl who bravely attempts to track down her meth-cooking father when he skips bail and disappears. With her family's home at risk, it falls to her to confront her strange and often dangerous extended family to try and discover his whereabouts. It's a sparse, threatening film which makes the Ozark Mountains feel like the most terrifying place on earth.

    Picnic At Hanging Rock (1975)
    Peter Weir's haunting and evocative mystery about 3 girls and a teacher who go missing during a school trip to Hanging Rock defies explanation. It suggests plenty but explains nothing and it's eerily unsettling atmosphere will stay with you for days.

    Witness (1985)
    Another Peter Weir thriller in which a young Amish boy witnesses a murder in a Philadelphia bus station. When detective Harrison Ford realises the crime is part of a conspiracy involving officers in his department he flees to join the Amish community where Samuel, the young boy lives with his mother Rachel, played by Kelly McGillis. It's another beautifully shot, intelligent classic for which Ford earned his one and only Oscar nomination.

Credits

Presenter
Claudia Winkleman
Presenter
Claudia Winkleman
Presenter
Danny Leigh
Presenter
Danny Leigh
Series Producer
Jayne Stanger
Series Producer
Jayne Stanger
Executive Producer
Basil Comely
Executive Producer
Basil Comely

Broadcasts

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