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14/01/2012

Duration:
30 minutes
First broadcast:
Saturday 14 January 2012

The Afghan women still suffering in silence - ten years after the fall of the Taliban. Caroline Wyatt, who's just back from Kabul, examines how their lives might change once the international community withdraws its troops from their country. Nick Thorpe's been to meet the president of Hungary - a man at the centre of a political and constitutional storm. Laura Trevelyan's in Haiti where, two years ago, a 35-second earthquake killed more than three hundred thousand people. She finds the process of reconstruction is still going on -- some say it's taking too long. Sara Hashash is in Cairo where they're trying to salvage what they can from thirty truckloads of ancient books, manuscripts and other documents damaged and destroyed during fighting in the capital last year and our Europe correspondent Chris Morris takes a break from talking about bail-outs and over-the-counter derivatives and heads off to Copenhagen for a heart-to-heart with the Queen of Denmark.

Chapters

6 items
  • Introduction

  • Fears over violence against Afghan women

    Caroline Wyatt meets Afghan women who have been raped and abused, even by their own families, and those trying to improve women's rights in the country.

  • Are Hungary's reforms a step too far?

    As Hungary's new constitutional and financial reforms meet with strong opposition, Nick Thorpe considers the government's record in office.

  • Haiti's slow road to recovery

    Two years after an earthquake killed more than 300,000 people, Laura Trevelyan meets the country's president, Michel Martelly, and finds the country's reconstruction is far from complete.

  • Saving Egypt's written history from fiery end

    Thousands of documents could be lost after a fire at the Institute of Egypt, but restorers are working day and night to save some of the country's most precious books.

  • Heart to heart with Denmark's Queen

    Europe correspondent Chris Morris takes a break from talking about bail-outs and over-the-counter derivatives and heads off to Copenhagen to meet the Queen of Denmark, Margrethe II.

  • Trying to salvage what they can from 30 truckloads of books that have been damaged or destroyed

    Trying to salvage what they can from 30 truckloads of books that have been damaged or destroyed

    The ancient books and manuscripts were damaged after the Institut d’Egypte was firebombed during clashes between demonstrators and the army in December 2010.

  • A painstaking process

    A painstaking process

    The vast rescue operation in progress at Egypt’s National Archives offices.

  • "Un-making of history"

    "Un-making of history"

    The institute held more than 200,000 rare reference books and bound manuscripts dating back to the 1500s, in five languages: Arabic, French, English, German and Russian.

Broadcasts

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