Leap Confronting Conflict

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Duration: 10 minutes

Ex-EastEnders actress Brooke Kinsella makes an emotional appeal to raise funds for Leap Confronting Conflict, a charity which teaches young people how to resolve conflict without resorting to violence. It is a cause close to her heart, since her younger brother Ben Kinsella was murdered in London three years ago, a victim of the capital's knife crime. Ben was just walking home one night when he was singled out and stabbed; he died in hospital that night. He was one of over 100 teenagers that died as a result of youth violence between 2008 and 2010. Brooke meets Josh, a young man who turned away from gang life and is now a successful entrepreneur, thanks to the help of Leap.

  • Donate online now

    Donate online now

    You can donate to Leap Confronting Conflict by going to the website www.leapconfrontingconflict.org.uk or by calling 020 7561 3700. Or if you’d like to post a donation please make your cheque payable to Leap Confronting Conflict and send to Wells House, 5-7 Wells Terrace, London, N4 3JU.

    Leap Confronting Conflict
  • Leap Confronting Conflict

    Leap Confronting Conflict

    Leap Confronting Conflict works nationally with young people that want to address issues of conflict in their lives to prevent them from escalating to violence. The young people Leap works with often lack aspirations, opportunities and a route out of poverty and social exclusion. We target communities with high levels of youth violence and crime; to transform the chaotic and volatile lives of young people, helping them to take responsibility and become role models.

    Over the past three years we have worked with more than 30,000 young people across schools, prisons, young offender institutions, the police and on the streets. In particular, we work with young people who are excluded, or involved with gang activity, anti-social behaviour or crime. Our training provides them with essential life skills, personal development opportunities and qualifications that support them to make positive choices. As one young person said, "Leap made a real difference. If the programme wasn't offered I don't know what or where I would be now. I am now a role model to young people and within my community".

    With the help of the BBC Lifeline Appeal we hope to show you what a life-changing difference Leap can make and how vital our work is to secure a safe and happy future for our nation’s young people.

  • Brooke Kinsella MBE

    Brooke Kinsella MBE

    Three years ago I lost my sixteen year old brother, Ben, to knife crime. He was just walking home one night when he was singled out and stabbed. He died in hospital that night. Ben was one of over 100 teenagers that died as a result of youth violence between 2008 and 2010. Ever since his death my family and I have been campaigning for an end to knife crime. I don’t want anyone else to have to experience the pain and loss that we feel through losing Ben.

    Leap Confronting Conflict is a charity that I believe in very much. I have seen many schemes that try to deter young people from violence and crime, but Leap not only enables young people to turn their lives around, it gives them the skills and ability to make choices to ensure it is long term. The charity’s youth programmes also enable young people to mentor others, giving them the voice and opportunity to share their experiences and help others who have lost their way. I wanted to be involved in their Lifeline appeal to try and ensure their brilliant work can continue.

  • Josh

    Josh

    Josh is 19 and lives in South London. From an early age his parents had high hopes for him, but he was expelled from school just before his GCSE’s for getting into a fight. Feeling angry and rejected, Josh started to lose his way. “I got really deep into gangs, I just felt like my life was going downhill.” Over the past 3 years, Leap has reached over 30,000 young people, like Josh. He told Brooke how his life has changed since completing the youth conflict programme with Leap, “I’ve now started my own business. I recently passed an electrician’s course so I’m a qualified electrician and I’m getting paid work from Leap.” When Brooke asked what his life could have been like if he hadn’t been helped by Leap, Josh simply replied, “I could have been in prison, or dead.”

  • Karl

    Karl

    22 year old Karl grew up in inner city London where he was exposed to drugs and violence. He was excluded from school and sent to a Pupil Referral Unit where he says he was exposed gang life on an even wider scale. He has since attended two programmes run by Leap. Karl says, “The workshops have basically changed me. I now think a lot more before I act and speak. Now I kind of go through a thought process in my head about the decisions I make, how they’re going to affect me later on down the line and also people around me.”

    Karl is now setting up his own project going into primary schools and passing on his knowledge to kids in trouble and getting them back into school.

  • Jerusha

    Jerusha

    From the age of 12, Jerusha was a young carer for her mother and two younger brothers. When she was struggling to cope, a project leader at her school suggested she try Leap. Jerusha excelled at the Leap programme and was invited back to join the Young trainers scheme. She now works as a freelance Young trainer for Leap, passing on what she has learnt to other young people. Jerusha says “The Leap courses helped me understand a lot about my own personal conflict, they built my confidence up. I never thought I’d be able to stand in front of 30 people, telling them what to do. It’s very empowering.”

Credits

Executive Producer
Lisa Ausden

Broadcasts

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