Bristol Channel

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Duration: 59 minutes

Helen Skelton travels along the English shore of the Bristol Channel. Helen begins her journey by visiting the hidden village of Culbone.

Following the coast she finds out why the picturesque fishing village of Porlock Weir is under threat from the tide, learns how Grade I listed Dunster Castle stays warm in winter and ends her journey at a wildlife rescue centre releasing herring gulls back into the wild.

  • this week : the bristol channel

    this week : the bristol channel

    The Bristol Channel is a major inlet separating South Wales from Devon and Somerset in South West England. It extends from the lower estuary of the river Severn to the North Atlantic Ocean and is over 30 miles (50 km) across at its widest point.

    Long stretches of the coastline of the Bristol Channel, on both the South Wales and West Country sides, are designated as heritage coast.

  • Helen Skelton arrives at the quant village of Culbone

    Helen Skelton arrives at the quant village of Culbone

    Culbone is a tiny hamlet consisting of a church and a couple of cottages in a remote combe surrounded by woodland. These woods were once a site of a major charcoal burning industry thought to have been originally manned by a colony of lepers.

    The South West coast path, Britain’s longest way-marked long distance footpath, winds through Culbone past St Beuno’s church, England’s smallest complete parish church. The original structure of this building dates back to the 12th century and it is still very much a place of worship with services held fortnightly.

  • Helen Skelton arrives at the quant village of Culbone

    Culbone is a tiny hamlet consisting of a church and a couple of cottages in a remote combe surrounded by woodland. These woods were once a site of a major charcoal burning industry thought to have been originally manned by a colony of lepers.

    The South West coast path, Britain’s longest way-marked long distance footpath, winds through Culbone past St Beuno’s church, England’s smallest complete parish church. The original structure of this building dates back to the 12th century and it is still very much a place of worship with services held fortnightly.

  • the future of Porlock Weir

    the future of Porlock Weir

    Porlock Weir is one of the most picturesque ports anywhere on the British coast with its harbour dating back over 1,000 years. It is therefore not surprising that it is extremely popular with tourists, but with rising sea levels and extreme storms the future of Porlock Weir is under threat.


    Unstoppable natural forces are predicted to become more frequent and severe over time, but it has been decided by the Shoreline Management Plan that there will be “no active intervention”.

    Therefore the Somerset Coastal Change Pathfinder project has been established to assist coastal communities who are most at risk from issues associated with sea level rise and help them adapt to projected changes at the coast.

    More about this project
  • Dunster cASTLE

    Dunster cASTLE

    A castle has sat at the top of the hill at Dunster for more than 1,000 years. The present building was re-modeled by Anthony Salvin in 1868-72, enabling the family to accommodate increased domestic areas as well as show rooms for entertaining. The Castle was home to the Luttrell family for over 600 years and was given to the National Trust in 1976.

    In 2008 The National Trust installed solar panels behind the battlements on the roof in order to provide electricity and make the premises more environmentally friendly. This is the first time National Trust has done this on a Grade I listed building and it is expected to save three tones of carbon a year.

    The positioning of the solar panels on the Castle is such that they can’t be seen from the surrounding higher ground. To achieve this, a volunteer member of staff took photographs from all the surrounding high points and views to ensure the solar panels could not be seen.

    Dunster Castle website
  • Dunster cASTLE

    A castle has sat at the top of the hill at Dunster for more than 1,000 years. The present building was re-modeled by Anthony Salvin in 1868-72, enabling the family to accommodate increased domestic areas as well as show rooms for entertaining. The Castle was home to the Luttrell family for over 600 years and was given to the National Trust in 1976.

    In 2008 The National Trust installed solar panels behind the battlements on the roof in order to provide electricity and make the premises more environmentally friendly. This is the first time National Trust has done this on a Grade I listed building and it is expected to save three tones of carbon a year.

    The positioning of the solar panels on the Castle is such that they can’t be seen from the surrounding higher ground. To achieve this, a volunteer member of staff took photographs from all the surrounding high points and views to ensure the solar panels could not be seen.

    Dunster Castle website
  • Secret Life Wildlife Rescue Centre

    Secret Life Wildlife Rescue Centre

    Secret World specialises in the rescue, rehabilitation and eventual release of orphaned, injured and sick wildlife, and is the only 24/7 service in the South West of its kind.

    Pauline and Derek Kidner opened New Road Farm (now Secret World) to visitors in 1984, having seen how the animals were cared for the public brought more and more injured wildlife to the farm in the hope that they could be treated in the same way.

    Gradually the number of wildlife escalated and now the centre helps around 4000 sick and injured animals every year.

    more about the centre

Credits

Presenter
Helen Skelton
Presenter
Helen Skelton
Executive Producer
Sarah Moors
Executive Producer
Sarah Moors

Broadcasts

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