Episode 4

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Bang Goes the Theory, Series 5 Episode 4 of 8

Duration: 30 minutes

The team puts more science to the test. Liz Bonnin investigates new stem-cell research that could change the face of organ transplant surgery, Dr Yan Wong tries out the Nocebo effect (placebo's evil twin), and at a memory boot camp Dallas Campbell discovers how to remember where he left his keys.

The programme is co-produced with the Open University. For more ways to put science to the test, go to www.bbc.co.uk/bang and follow the links to The Open University.

  • In your elements

    In your elements

    Use The Open University's new interactive tool to explore the role of the elements in the human body - including which elements you should avoid, and which are essential to life.

    The OU: Elements of the Periodic Table
  • Bang LIVE

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    See what happens when the Bang Goes the Theory team take their live show on the road.

    Find out how to apply for your free tickets to Bang LIVE
  • Shocking stuff

    Shocking stuff

    They say it's a fine line between pleasure and pain - perhaps that's why Dr Yan and his 'victim' are all smiles in this investigation into the nocebo effect.

    No members of the public were harmed in this experiment!

  • Dr Magneto

    Dr Magneto

    Here's how to make a powerful electro magnet with some copper wire, a piece of iron and a small battery.

    Dr Yan makes an electro magnet
  • Live forever?

    Live forever?

    Why do naked mole rats live so long? Liz speaks to Dr Tom Vulliamy about telomeres and their link to ageing.

    Liz finds out about telomeres

Credits

Presenter
Liz Bonnin
Presenter
Liz Bonnin
Presenter
Dallas Campbell
Presenter
Dallas Campbell
Presenter
Jem Stansfield
Presenter
Jem Stansfield
Series Producer
Paul King
Series Producer
Paul King

Broadcasts

The Open University

The Open University

If Bang stirs your interest in science then visit The Open University and discover more.

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