Episode 17

Image for Episode 17Not currently available on BBC iPlayer

Gardeners' World, 2011 Episode 17 of 28

Duration: 30 minutes

Monty Don prunes the deciduous hedges that are key part of the structure and form of Longmeadow. He shows us how to shape and cut as well as share tips on the right tools for the job. He also plants dahlias and cannas in pots for colour that will last from now and into the autumn and will provide a vibrant replacement for the spent lilies.

Monty also heads to the capital and gets exclusive access to the second largest garden in London, the US Ambassador's garden where he meets head gardener, Stephen Crisp who has created a wonderful 'country house' style garden in the middle of a bustling city.

Carol Klein visits an urban garden with a difference - a bijou NGS garden called Little Eden where the owners have created a small, charming oasis of colour in the heart of a housing estate near Wakefield.

  • GARDEN FEATURED - LITTLE EDEN

    GARDEN FEATURED - LITTLE EDEN

    Linda Moran visited the Eden Project nine years ago and was inspired to try growing tender tropicals in her small Yorkshire garden. With hard work and great care, Linda has created a wonderful lush garden in a tiny space.

    Some of Linda’s favourite plants are: Impatiens niamniamensis 'Congo Cockatoo, the Congo cockatoo busy lizzie, Gentiana tibetica the Tibetan gentian, Aroids like Arisaemas and Dragon arums, and Epilobium glabellum, a small white Willowherb. Linda also grows Aeonium arboreum 'Atropurpureum' the Purple tree aeonium. It has done so well in her Yorkshire garden, it even flowers for her.

    Linda’s garden is open for The National Gardens Scheme on the 14th August (10am-4pm). Visitors also welcome by appointment.

    Little Eden
    29 Lancaster St
    Castleford
    Yorks
    WF10 2NP
    Tel: 01977 514275

    The National Gardens Scheme (NGS)
  • GARDEN FEATURED - WINFIELD HOUSE

    GARDEN FEATURED - WINFIELD HOUSE

    London’s second largest private garden belongs to Winfield House, the official residence of the United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom. An impressive twelve and a half acres of formal gardens and parkland set in Regent’s Park, provide a restorative and tranquil refuge not only for the Ambassador and his family, but also for visiting American Presidents on their official visits.

    Head Gardener, Stephen Crisp has met 5 American Presidents, and has managed and developed the garden with as much care and attention, as if it were his own. With 7000 visitors a year, some of them Heads of State, Stephen keeps the garden in immaculate condition. He also produces the bedding, and many of the flowers for the house, within the garden.

    Monty had a rare and privileged tour with Stephen, and discovered some of the fascinating history of the house and garden.

    Winfield House
    Regent’s Park
    London

    Winfield House is not open to the public.

    Winfield House garden, Flickr page:
  • HEDGE CLIPPING

    HEDGE CLIPPING

    Formal hedges are best trimmed at least once, possibly twice a year, while they're actively growing. Beech and hornbeam hedges are best pruned in August, as this encourages them to retain their leaves over the winter. It is important to create a good batter to your hedge; this is cutting it at an angle, so the top of the hedge is narrower than the bottom. If the batter is not maintained, the lower sections of the hedge will be shaded out, and become thinner and less dense.

    Remember safety first: If you use an electric trimmer, make sure it's plugged into a safety socket fitted with a residual current device or circuit breaker, so that the engine will cut out if there's an accident.
    When trimming, keep the cable away from the blade, ideally draped over one shoulder rather than trailing on the ground.

    Wear appropriate protective equipment such as ear defenders, goggles and gloves.

    In most parts of England evergreen boundary hedges must be maintained at two metres. However, in all parts of the UK, it is best to check with your local council for height restriction in your specific area.

    More information from the RHS on hedges
  • DAHLIAS

    DAHLIAS

    Dahlias are brilliant for colour late into the season. They can be grown from seed, or taken from cuttings in the spring to flower that same year. Monty took a number of cuttings earlier this year, and will be using these same plants to provide colour in his containers this autumn. Here are a few of Monty’s favourite varieties:
    Dahlia ‘Arabian Night’, ‘Grenadier’, ‘David Howard’, ‘Chimborazo’, ‘Black Fire’, ‘Julie One’, ‘Wittemans Superba’, and ‘Hillcrest Royal’.

    RHS information on growing Dahlias
  • CANNAS

    CANNAS

    Canna lilies have become a lush vibrant part of the late season display. Being tropical, they require moist well fed soil, and plenty of warmth to be at their best. Bright flowers in oranges and reds rise high above large striped foliage, they make a fantastic addition to the Jewel Garden at Longmeadow.

    Lift them, and store them in a frost free location over the winter; before planting them out the following year, their rhizomes can easily be divided, providing even more colour the following season.

    Monty grows two varieties of Canna: Durban and Wyoming. Both with bright orange flowers, but Durban with rich vibrant stripy leaves, and Wyoming with its more muted, darker foliage.

    RHS information on growing Cannas
  • JOBS FOR THE WEEKEND: GROUP POTS IN THE SHADE

    By grouping pots in the shade, standing them on trays, and giving them a good watering, you will increase the amount of time you can leave your pots unattended while you are away. And if they do dry out, the shade will protect them from the worst of the damage from the sun.

  • JOBS FOR THE WEEKEND: WATER AND MULCH

    Protect newly planted veg such as lettuce and brassicas from drying out while you are on holiday, by irrigating them well, and mulching with a good layer of compost. The compost will keep the moisture in the soil, and insulate the roots from the heat of the sun.

  • JOBS FOR THE WEEKEND: HARVEST AND CUT BACK ALL RIPE VEGETABLES

    To keep your plot cropping well, harvest as much as you can and either store it, or give it away before you leave on holiday. This will encourage your plants to keep producing, and by the time you get home, you will have a fresh new crop to collect.

    More seasonal advice from the BBC

Credits

Presenter
Monty Don
Presenter
Carol Klein
Producer
Louise Hampden
Series Producer
Liz Rumbold

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