My Life as a Turkey: Natural World Special

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Natural World, 2011-2012 Episode 1 of 13

Duration: 1 hour

Biologist Joe Hutto was mother to the strangest family in the world, thirteen endangered wild turkeys that he raised from egg to the day they left home.

For a whole year his turkey children were his only companions as he walked them deep through the Florida Everglades. Suffering all the heartache and joy of any other parent as he tried to bring up his new family, he even learnt to speak their language and began to see the world through turkey eyes. Told as a drama documentary with an actor recreating the remarkable scenes of Joe's life as a turkey mum.

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Music Played

9 items
  • FILMING THE WILD TURKEY FAMILY

    FILMING THE WILD TURKEY FAMILY

    Behind the scenes image of turkeys and Jeff Palmer (actor) in misty forest in Florida. Cameraman (Mark Smith) on track & dolly shows how some of the beautiful sweeping shots were filmed.

  • WILD TURKEY STANDING ON CAMERA

    WILD TURKEY STANDING ON CAMERA

  • WILD TURKEYS CLAMBERING OVER CREW

    WILD TURKEYS CLAMBERING OVER CREW

    Turkeys climbing all over David Allen (director), Jeff Palmer (actor) and Mark Smith (cameraman).

  • ON A CALL SURROUNDED BY TURKEYS

    ON A CALL SURROUNDED BY TURKEYS

    Jeff Palmer (actor) sat on large felled tree on his cell phone with a dozen wild turkeys.

  • SOME FACTS ABOUT TURKEYS

    The wild turkey was first domesticated by Native Americans. Spanish explorers took the birds to Europe in the 16th century.

    Turkeys’ heads change colour when they become excited.

    We will eat 10 million turkeys this Christmas. These are the artificially bred descendents of the American Wild Turkey.

    The turkey was Benjamin Franklin's choice for the United States' national bird (he considered the bald eagle as a bird of bad moral character).

    A wild turkey’s gobble can be heard up to one mile away!

    Turkeys can run at speeds up to 25 mph, and they can fly up to 55 mph.

Credits

Series Editor
Steve Greenwood
Series Editor
Steve Greenwood
Producer
Dave Allen
Producer
Dave Allen

Broadcasts

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