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Liverpool Riots - Children and Politics

Duration:
30 minutes
First broadcast:
Wednesday 13 July 2011

30 years ago riots broke out in Liverpool which lead to 160 arrests and 258 police officers needing hospital treatment. The four days of street battles, arson and looting lead to violent disturbances in many other British cities and have changed community relations and disorder policing in the country forever. On today's Thinking Allowed, Laurie Taylor explores a study of first hand accounts of those tumultuous days, from police officers, rioters and residents. Richard Phillips and Diane Frost recreate the times.
Also on the programme, what makes a child political? Dorothy Moss discusses research which reveals how engaged young children are in issues and social change.
Producer: Charlie Taylor.

  • Dr Richard Phillips

    Reader in Geography at the University of Liverpool

    Liverpool ’81: Remembering the Riots
    Edited by Diane Frost and Richard Phillips
    Publisher: Liverpool University Press
    ISBN-10: 1846316685
    ISBN-13: 978-1846316685

    Find out more about Richard Phillips
  • Diane Frost

    Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Liverpool

    Liverpool ’81: Remembering the Riots
    Edited by Diane Frost and Richard Phillips
    Publisher: Liverpool University Press
    ISBN-10: 1846316685
    ISBN-13: 978-1846316685

    Find out more about Diane Frost
  • Dr Dorothy Moss

    Principal Lecturer in Childhood Studies at Leeds Metropolitan University

    The Form of Children’s Political Engagement in Everyday Life
    Published in Children & Society
    The International Journal of Childhood & Children’s Services (2011)
    vol.25, issue 4
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1099-0860.2011.00373.x

    Find out more about Dorothy Moss

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    Thinking Allowed

    Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works and discusses current ideas on how…

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