05/06/2011

Image for 05/06/2011Not currently available on BBC iPlayer

Duration: 1 hour

Countryfile heads to Northumberland where Julia Bradbury explores Kielder Water and Forest Park. It's home to northern Europe's largest man-made lake and England's largest forest. Julia examines how the wildlife of a massive forest like this is managed and discovers why it has become such a refuge for tawny owls, goshawks and red squirrels. On the water, Julia finds out about a catch-and-release policy that is helping the European stocks of migratory salmon and sea trout thrive.

In the neighbouring county of Durham, Matt Baker returns to his childhood home of Easington to find out about Domesday Reloaded. It is an ambitious update of a 1986 BBC project to record a snapshot of everyday life across the UK. He takes a journey of discovery to reveal how some of the former mining towns of the county have been transformed into havens for wildlife.

John Craven investigates why so many dairy farms are going out of business and asks whether the only way to survive is for farms to get bigger. On his Cotswold farm, Adam Henson is busy deciding which of his rams will make the grade for breeding.

  • KIELDER FOREST

    KIELDER FOREST

    IMAGE: Julia with one of Kielder Forest's newest residents

    Over the last 30 years the Forestry Commission has been transforming Kielder Forest, one of Europe’s largest man-made woodlands, from mainly Sitka Spruce into a thriving mix of conifer and broadleaf trees. The forest now supports some of Britain’s most treasured wildlife and it’s a stronghold for the English red squirrel. This week, Julia visits the industrial heart of the forest to see how a 155,000 acre woodland earns its keep. And she helps ornithologist Martin Davidson to ring the new population of tawny owl chicks….

    Click for a guide to spotting wildlife in Kielder Forest Park
  • LIVING NORTH SEA PROJECT

    LIVING NORTH SEA PROJECT

    IMAGE: Kielder Fish - Anne Lewis teaches Julia about the life of our precious native pearl mussels.

    The building of Kielder Dam in the 1980s produced Europe’s largest man-made lake and provided drinking water and power for thousands of homes in the North East. But it also blocked a major migration route for Atlantic salmon and sea trout. Julia meets the Environment Agency team responsible for keeping stocks healthy by moving fish around this enormous man-made obstacle. And she finds out why their survival is important to one of our other rare native species, the pearl mussel.

    Find out more about the Living North Sea Project
  • DOMESDAY RELOADED

    DOMESDAY RELOADED

    IMAGE: Matt with Jason Fitzpatrick and a Domesday machine, from the Centre for Computing History

    This week Matt Baker is delving 25 years into his own past. In 1986, 1 million people took part in an ambitious BBC project to capture a snapshot of time in a single accessible database. A quarter of a century later, the entire archive has been put online. Matt returns home to discover how the area has changed – from updated technology and playground games at his old school, to the diversification of business on his old mate’s farm.

    Delve into your own past or take part in Domesday Reloaded
  • JULIA BRADBURY AGED 5

    JULIA BRADBURY AGED 5

    IMAGE: On this week's programme Matt promises Julia that he is going to find and post a photo of her as a child on the website and he's as good as his word!

  • DURHAM LITTLE TERNS

    Once blackened by discarded, unworkable coal spoil, the beaches of Durham’s coast are now dramatic expanses of clean sand and pebbles, buffeted by wind and perfect for a colony of little terns. Matt’s finding out how the voluntary warden team at Crimdon Dene nature reserve is helping this important population to prosper.

    Find out more about the little tern and other places to see them around the UK
  • HELEN SKELTON JOINS THE COUNTRYFILE TEAM

    HELEN SKELTON JOINS THE COUNTRYFILE TEAM

    IMAGE: Helen Skelton in one of her favourite places, Dufton Ghyll Wood

    Famous for her amazing feats of bravery and endurance for Blue Peter and Sport Relief, this week, Helen Skelton joins the Countryfile team. Although she lives in the city, she’s still a country girl at heart. So, Countryfile went back to her family farm to see the places she grew up and hear memories of her life there. They weren’t all good and we discover how foot and mouth forced her dad out of dairy farming and how they coped with the aftermath.
    Helen also takes us to two of her favourite places: Cross Fell is the highest peak in the North Pennines and famous for having the UK’s only named wind – the Helm Wind. Dufton Ghyll Wood is a tranquil patch of semi-ancient woodland carpeted with bluebells and the perfect antidote for the stresses of city life.

    Find out more about Dufton Ghyll Wood
  • ADAM’S FARM – SHEARLING RAMS

    ADAM’S FARM – SHEARLING RAMS

    IMAGE: Adam with a shearling ram

    The ram lambs that were born last year are now reaching maturity and Adam has to assess which ones have made the grade. Only a few will be good enough to sell for breeding, the rest will go for meat. Meanwhile, the dry spring means that the sheep have very little grass to graze, so Adam has arranged to take them to pastures new.

  • JOHN CRAVEN INVESTIGATES: DAIRY FARMING

    JOHN CRAVEN INVESTIGATES: DAIRY FARMING

    IMAGE: John with dairy farmer Ken Moss and his son Dan

    John investigates why so many farmers are getting out of dairy farming, at a time when the price they are being paid for their milk is higher than it has been for fifteen years. Seven hundred UK dairy farmers have left the industry in the last twelve months and John spends the day with a third generation dairy who is selling his herd of more than three hundred milking cows because he can't turn a profit. John discovers that the cost of fuel and animal feed are just two of the factors which have led to many farmers losing a penny or more on every pint they produce. They say the increase in the price they are being paid for their milk doesn't compensate for the rising costs of running a dairy. So is there any way to turn a profit? John finds out.

    Click for more information about dairy farming

Credits

Presenter
Julia Bradbury
Presenter
Julia Bradbury
Presenter
Matt Baker
Presenter
Matt Baker
Presenter
John Craven
Presenter
John Craven
Presenter
Adam Henson
Presenter
Adam Henson
Series Producer
Teresa Bogan
Series Producer
Teresa Bogan

Broadcasts

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